Moviedrome Mondays: Dead Ringers (1988) and Rabid (1977)

As with last week, this Moviedrome Monday entry consists of a double bill offering of two great films for the price of one. Only this time, the two featured films here are directed by the same person, who in this case, would be the legendary David Cronenberg. In addition, Dead Ringers and Rabid (this week’s titles) can also be labeled as just two of many classic examples of cinematic body horror, a sub-genre that Cronenberg popularized, If not invented (read here). If any of you readers are interested, here is a link to my favorite David Cronenberg films (read here).

Dead Ringers (1988)

I have posted a youtube video link below to Moviedrome presenter Alex Cox’s introduction to master Canadian auteur David Cronenberg’s 1988 psychological body horror/drama/thriller Dead Ringers. Readers can also read Cox’s intro transcript here. The episode’s original airdate was May 31, 1992 (read here). Though I disagree with Cox regarding the acting in Cronenberg’s then previous films (deliriously wooden), on a whole, I absolutely agree with him about everything that is positive about both the aforementioned filmmaker and Dead Ringers itself. Last, but not least, Jeremy Irons dual performance as twin gynecologists Beverly and Elliot Mantle (loosely based on the real life Stewart and Cyril Marcus) is a tour de force.

Here is a youtube video link to Alex Cox’s Moviedrome intro to Dead Ringers


Here is a youtube video link to the film’s original theatrical trailer


Rabid (1977)

I have posted a youtube video link below to Moviedrome presenter Alex Cox’s introduction to master Canadian auteur David Cronenberg’s 1977 body horror gem Rabid. Readers can also read Cox’s intro transcript here. The episode’s original airdate was June 1, 1992 (read here). While I do disagree with Cox regarding his thoughts on directors Dario Argento and Brian De Palma, I nod in agreement with all of the praise he lavishes on both Cronenberg and Rabid. Though I may not echo Cox’s sentiment of Rabid as Cronenberg’s best (he has surpassed himself numerous times since), it is undeniably every bit as masterful as his other films (body horror or otherwise).

Here is a youtube video link to Alex Cox’s Moviedrome intro to Rabid. Cox’s introduction begins at the 4:05 mark on the video


Here is a youtube video link to the film’s original theatrical trailer

Moviedrome Mondays: Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981) and F for Fake (1973)

Series 5 of Moviedrome opens spectacularly with not one, but two great films in my opinion. It also happens to be (as you guessed) another double bill entry 🙂

Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981)

I have posted a youtube video link below to Moviedrome presenter Alex Cox’s introduction to Australian filmmaker George Miller’s widely acclaimed 1981 post-apocalyptic action masterpiece Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior. Readers can also read Cox’s intro transcript here. The episode’s original airdate was May 24, 1992 (read here). For me, Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior ranks alongside 2015’s Mad Max: Fury Road (also directed by Miller) as my two favorites of the Mad Max franchise, which consists of four films altogether. Along with Fury Road, I also rank The Road Warrior as one of the two many greatest action films ever made (sequel or not). If any of you readers are interested, here is a link to my favorite George Miller films (read here).

Here is a youtube video link to Alex Cox’s Moviedrome intro to Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior

Here is a youtube video link to the film’s original theatrical trailer


F for Fake (1973)

Since I could not find a youtube video link to Moviedrome presenter Alex Cox’s introduction to legendary American filmmaker Orson Welles bold 1973 avant-garde masterwork F for Fake, readers will have to rely on Cox’s intro transcript (read here). The episode’s original airdate was May 24, 1992 (read here). On the surface, what makes F for Fake so innovative lies in how Welles cleverly blends form (the film essay format) with content (the theme of fakery). At the center, it comes from Welles playful delivery of this already inspired combination. If any of you readers are interested, here is a link to my favorite Orson Welles films (read here).

Here is a youtube video link to what may be a 9-minute trailer for the film, though it reportedly contains no scenes from the film (read here).


Here is a youtube video link to another trailer, but I am not sure If it was one for the U.S. or another country


This youtube video link is for another trailer to it


Here is a youtube video link to a Ventura Club Society trailer.


Here is a youtube video link to documentary filmmaker Morgan Neville’s commentary for it from The Criterion Collection


Here is a youtube video link to film director/critic/historian Peter Bogdanovich’s commentary for it from The Criterion Collection

Here is a youtube video link to Bogdanovich’s longer version of that commentary

BTW, the then unfinished film Bogdanovich talks about in the link (The Other Side of the Wind) got completed and was released on the streaming service Netflix back in 2018. Here is a youtube video link to the trailer below

Last, but not least, If any of you readers are interested in learning more about the term film essay (or essay film), here is a link to a 2013 BFI (British Film Institute) article on it

https://www2.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/sight-sound-magazine/features/deep-focus/essay-film

Moviedrome Mondays: Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters (1985)

Once again, I could not find a youtube video link of Moviedrome presenter Alex Cox introducing director/co-writer Paul Schrader’s 1985 experimental bio-pic Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters, readers will have to rely on Cox’s intro transcript (read here). The episode’s original airdate was September 8, 1991 (read here). I agree with everything that Cox has said here. Though a certain number of other viewers may have implied this before, for myself, as a bio-pic, the film’s biggest flaw lies in it’s sanitization of the more controversial aspects that shaped Japanese writer Yukio Mishima’s life (personal or otherwise). Nevertheless, it is a good film with a unique music score by famed minimalist composer Philip Glass, an interesting approach to narrative regarding it’s subject and it’s visually dazzling use of color – just look at that amazing colour palette on display throughout.

Here is a youtube video link to the film’s original theatrical trailer

Moviedrome Mondays: Solaris (1972)

Since I could not find a youtube video link of Moviedrome presenter Alex Cox’s introducing master Russian filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky’s 1972 science-fiction classic Solaris, readers will have to rely on Cox’s intro transcript (read here). The episode’s original airdate was September 1, 1991 (read here). Once again, not much to add here except that it ranks as one of (If not) the greatest of Tarkovsky’s great films. If any of you readers are interested, here is a link to my favorite Andrei Tarkovsky films (read here).

BTW, a shout-out to frequent visitor Steve (his youtube channel is here) that I just approved his comment under my blog entry regarding my favorite Billy Wilder films. I had just discovered the comment there today. The comment did not show up under my notification feed and I thought everything was fine. Little did I know, the notification for this showed up under my e-mail, but not on here – what’s up with that? Nevertheless, I feel bad that I replied to Steve’s comment so late and I just want to let him know that I will do better in the future to make sure his comments get approved on here right away and not days later. In the future, I will also make sure that I check my e-mail every single day so a mistake like this does not happen again. Once again Steve, I apologize If you got worried on whether your comment was ever going to get approved 🙂 In closing, I just want to let Steve know that I just left a complimentary reply to his complimentary comment 🙂

Here is a youtube video link to the film’s original theatrical trailer


For those that prefer a subtitled trailer, here is a youtube video link to a special showing at the Austin Film Society back in 2018.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBYJH6UAAfw