My Favorite Robert Altman Films (2023 Edition)

All of the films and television stuff listed on here, I saw on either a home video format (VHS, Blu-Ray, DVD etc.) or through other means like from someplace online.

* * * * (Out of * * * *)

  1. Nashville (1975)
  2. Short Cuts (1993)
  3. Tanner ’88 (1988)
    (Miniseries)
    (Cable/Television)
  4. A Prairie Home Companion (2006)
  5. Robert Altman’s Jazz ’34 (1996)
    (Documentary)
    (Television)
  6. Kansas City (1996)
  7. 3 Women (1977)
  8. McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971)
  9. The Long Goodbye (1973)
  10. California Split (1974)
  11. Secret Honor (1984)
  12. The Player (1992)
  13. Streamers (1983)
  14. The Company (2003)
  15. Gosford Park (2001)
  16. Vincent & Theo (1990)
  17. Come Back to the Five & Dime Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean (1982)
  18. Cookie’s Fortune (1999)
  19. Popeye (1980)
  20. A Wedding (1978)
  21. Thieves Like Us (1974)
  22. Images (1972)
  23. Brewster McCloud (1970)
  24. M*A*S*H (1970)
  25. Rattlesnake in a Cooler (1982)
    (Television)
  26. The Laundromat (1985)
    (Cable/Television)
  27. That Cold Day in the Park (1969)
  28. The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial (1988)
    (Television)
  29. Tanner on Tanner (2004)
    (Miniseries)
    (Cable/Television)
  30. Gun – Season 1 (1997)
    Episode: All the President’s Women
    (Television)
  31. Buffalo Bill and the Indians, or Sitting Bull’s History Lesson (1976)
  32. Fool for Love (1985)
  33. HealtH (1980)
  34. The Gingerbread Man (1998)
  35. Aria (1987)
    Segment: Les Boreades
  36. A Perfect Couple (1979)
  37. Basements (1987)
    (Television)
  38. O.C. and Stiggs (1985)
  39. Ready to Wear (1994)
  40. Quintet (1979)
  41. Dr. T & the Women (2000)
  42. Killer App (1998)
    (Television)
  43. Beyond Therapy (1987)
  44. Bus Stop – Season 1 (1961)
    Episode: Accessory by Consent
    Episode: A Lion Walks Among Us
    (Television)
  45. Combat! – Season 1 (1962/1963)
    Episode: Forgotten Front (1962)
    Episode: Rear Echelon Commandos (1962)
    Episode: Any Second Now (1962)
    Episode: Escape to Nowhere (1962)
    Episode: Cat and Mouse (1962)
    Episode: I Swear by Apollo (1962)
    Episode: The Prisoner (1962)
    Episode: The Volunteer (1963)
    Episode: Off Limits (1963)
    Episode: Survival (1963)
    (Television)
  46. The Gallant Men – Season 1 (1962)
    Episode: Pilot
    (Television)
  47. Whirlybirds – Season 3 (1959)
    Episode: Experiment X-74
    Episode: The Challenge
    Episode: The Big Lie
    Episode: The Perfect Crime
    Episode: The Unknown Soldier
    Episode: Two of a Kind
    (Television)
  48. Whirlybirds – Season 2 (1958/1959)
    Episode: Infra-Red (1958)
    Episode: Blind Date (1958)
    Episode: Copters and Robbers (1958)
    Episode: Story of Sister Bridgit (1958)
    Episode: Glamour Girl (1958)
    Episode: Act of Fate (1958)
    Episode: Rest in Peace (1959)
    (Television)
  49. Bronco – Season 3 (1960)
    Episode: The Mustangers
    (Television)
  50. Kraft Suspense Theatre – Season 1 (1963/1964)
    Episode: The Long, Lost Life of Edward Smalley (1963)
    Episode: The Hunt (1963)
    Episode: Once Upon a Savage Night (1964)
    (Television)
  51. M Squad – Season 1 (1958)
    Episode: Lover’s Lane Killing
    (Television)
  52. Lawman – Season 3 (1961)
    Episode: The Robbery
    (Television)
  53. Hawaiian Eye – Season 1 (1959)
    Episode: Three Tickets to Lani
    (Television)
  54. Bonanza – Season 2 (1960/1961)
    Episode: Silent Thunder (1960)
    Episode: Bank Run (1961)
    Episode: The Duke (1961)
    Episode: The Rival (1961)
    Episode: The Secret (1961)
    Episode: The Dream Riders (1961)
    Episode: Sam Hill (1961)
    (Television)
  55. Route 66 – Season 2 (1961)
    Episode: Some of the People, Some of the Time
    (Television)
  56. Bonanza – Season 3 (1961)
    Episode: The Many Faces of Gideon Flinch
    (Television)
  57. Peter Gunn – Season 3 (1961)
    Episode: The Murder Bond
    (Television)
  58. Maverick – Season 4 (1960)
    Episode: Bolt from the Blue
    (Television)
  59. Alfred Hitchcock Presents – Season 3 (1957/1958)
    Episode: The Young One (1957)
    Episode: Together (1958)
    (Television)
  60. Nightmare in Chicago (1964)
    (Television)
  61. Sugarfoot – Season 3 (1959/1960)
    Episode: Apollo with a Gun (1959)
    Episode: The Highbinder (1960)
    (Television)
  62. The Gale Storm Show: Oh! Susanna – Season 4 (1960)
    Episode: It’s Magic
    (Television)
  63. Pot au feu (1967)
    (Short)
  64. Countdown (1967)
  65. The James Dean Story (1957)
    (co-directed with George W. George)
    (Documentary)
  66. The Dirty Look (1954)
    (Short)
  67. The Delinquents (1957)
  68. Modern Football (1951)
    (Short)
  69. The Perfect Crime (1955)
    (Short)
  70. The Sound of Bells (1952)
    (Short)
  71. The Magic Bond (1952)
    (Short)

Please note that their are 24 (or maybe more) Altman works (television or otherwise) that have yet to be discovered.

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My Favorite Chantal Akerman Films (2023 Edition)

All films listed here I watched either on a home video format or online 🙂 P.S. there are still plenty more Chantal Akerman films I need to check out.

* * * * (Out of * * * *)

  1. Jeanne Dielman, 23 quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1975)
  2. Portrait of a Young Girl at the End of the 60’s in Brussels (1994)
    (Television)
  3. Toute une nuit (1982)
  4. No Home Movie (2015)
    (Documentary)
  5. Golden Eighties (1986)
  6. Les Rendez-vous d’Anna (1978)
  7. News from Home (1977)
    (Documentary)
  8. Night and Day (1991)
  9. D’Est (1993)
    (Documentary)
  10. Down There (2006)
    (Documentary)
  11. Sud (1999)
    (Documentary)
  12. Je Tu Il Elle (1974)
  13. Hotel Monterey (1973)
  14. Almayer’s Folly (2011)
  15. De l’autre cote (2002)
    (Documentary)
  16. Tomorrow We Move (2004)
  17. La Captive (2000)
  18. A Couch in New York (1996)
  19. Saute ma Ville (1968/1971)
    (Short)

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to All of My Readers

Let’s face it, 2022 has been an emotionally exhausting year for all of us in some way or shape or form. While this can be said about any year, 2022 came close to matching the awfulness of 2020. That aforementioned year was when the still ongoing COVID-19 pandemic placed basically the entire world on lockdown. Nevertheless, our increased anxieties about everything around us sadly remains intact. All that being said, I would like to conclude this year with a youtube video link to the always radiant Kylie Minogue’s rendition of It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year. Minogue’s music serves as one of many perfect examples of things that have cheered me up whenever I am sad. I would also love to wish all of my dear readers a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Let us all hope that 2023 is better. Now without further ado, click here to watch 🙂

My Favorite Andrew Dominik Films

* * * * (Out of * * * *)

1.   The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007)

2.   One More Time with Feeling (2016)
(Documentary)

3.   Mindhunter – Season 2 (2019)
3a. Episode 4 (2019)
3b. Episode 5 (2019)
(Streaming Series)

* * * 1/2 (Out of * * * *)

1.   Killing Them Softly (2012)

2.   Chopper (2000)

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to All of My Readers

I just want to wish all of my readers a very Merry Christmas and a Happy 2021 🙂 Also, let us hope that 2021 is better than 2020 (i.e. Covid-19). As usual, look forward to more blog entries from me in the New Year 🙂

Now I would like to conclude this year with a youtube video link to Country singing legend Dolly Parton’s delightful 2020 rendition of A Holly Jolly Christmas (click here) 🙂

My Favorite Alan Rudolph Films

* * * * (Out of * * * *)

1.   Choose Me (1984)

2.   Remember My Name (1978)

3.   Afterglow (1997)

4.   The Moderns (1988)

5.   Trouble in Mind (1985)

6.   Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle (1994)

* * * 1/2 (Out of * * * *)

1.   Songwriter (1984)

2.   The Secret Lives of Dentists (2002)

3.   Welcome to L.A. (1976)

My Favorite Milos Forman Films

* * * * (Out of * * * *)

1.   Loves of a Blonde (1965)

2.   Taking Off (1971)

3.   The Firemen’s Ball (1967)

4.   Black Peter (1963)

* * * 1/2 (Out of * * * *)

1.   Man on the Moon (1999)

John Charet’s Take On: Always on Sunday (1965)

Upon reaching new creative heights with his previous Monitor entry The Debussy Film, director Ken Russell decided to end his career there on a quieter note with Always on Sunday, which aired one month later in June of 1965. For those interested, The Debussy Film’s original airdate was 05/18/65, while Always on Sunday’s was 06/29/65. Even so, Always on Sunday remains significant for reportedly being Russell’s first television documentary/docudrama to come off as a pure dramatization of a famous artist’s life (read here). Following broadcaster Huw Wheldon’s departure from the aforementioned programme in 1964, Russell was now free (at least for the most part) to expand upon his creativity as a filmmaker – The Debussy Film’s film-within-a-film format stands out in particular. As with Elgar, Russell tells his story in a similarly straightforward fashion, but unlike that earlier effort, Always on Sunday finds him taking a more laid-back approach to it at the same time.

Whereas Elgar and (in some ways) The Debussy Film centered on the lives of famed composers, Always on Sunday centers on the life of late 19th-century to early 20th-century French post-impressionist painter Henri Rousseau (1844-1910). Oliver Reed serves as the film’s narrator (seriously, what a mesmerizing voice), while James Lloyd handles lead acting duties as Rousseau. Annette Robertson (Gaby from The Debussy Film) also lends welcome support as (yes) pint-sized French symbolist writer Alfred Jarry (1873-1907), whose voice is dubbed here by an uncredited male actor. The scenario was concocted by Melvyn Bragg, who previously collaborated with director Ken Russell on The Debussy Film.

If I can name one thing that director Ken Russell does really well in Always on Sunday, it would lie in the sincere simplicity of his storytelling. Prior to his flamboyant later films, Russell had continuously proven himself to be a master of subtlety with his early television work at the BBC (1959-1970). This one, Elgar and Song of Summer (my personal favorite) notably demonstrates this aspect. Always on Sunday’s slow but steady pacing debatably resembles Russell’s way of appreciating the finer things in life. One memorable running gag involves Rousseau hauling around one of his paintings around the countryside back and forth in a wagon of sorts. Another involves Rousseau placing one of his paintings in a museum it the hopes of rivaling the work of some of his contemporaries. The action then cuts to some examples via their individual artwork: Camille Pissarro, Paul Cezanne, Vincent van Gogh, Georges Seurat and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.

As is occasionally typical of his work, Always on Sunday sometimes feels like a semi-autobiographical account of it’s director Ken Russell. An early sequence depicting French elitists ridiculing Rousseau’s paintings foreshadowed the hostile relationship between Russell and his critics. At the same time, he sees a little bit of himself in Alfred Jarry (a reported supporter of Rousseau). One such scene comes in the form of Jarry’s irreverent play Ubu Roi – a scathing satire on the bourgeoisie. Another example occurs when one of Rousseau’s neighbors complains to Jarry that his pistol firing (he carries two of them) is endangering her children. Jarry’s response is delightfully insulting – If that should be the case madam, we’d hope you get some new ones, the bedroom’s over there. For some odd reason, I can’t help but feel that Russell would applaud his response.

Capturing all of Elgar’s simplicity and none of The Debussy Film’s originality, Always on Sunday is like a warmup to director Ken Russell’s subsequent television films. The following year in 1966, he directed an entry for Sunday Night (Don’t Shoot the Composer) and a stand alone (Isadora Duncan, the Biggest Dancer in the World). The others were episodes of OmnibusDante’s Inferno in 1967, Song of Summer in 1968 and Dance of the Seven Veils in 1970. Those last four titles (I have not seen Don’t Shoot the Composer) arguably rank as major works on Russell’s resume. Always on Sunday may seem minor compared to them, but as with all of Russell’s films, it is a great one regardless of ranking.

-(Star Rating)-
* * * * (Out of * * * *)

Here is a link to Part 1 of the film

Here is a link to Part 2 of the film

Here is a link to Part 3 of the film