My Favorite William Wyler Films

* * * * (Out of * * * *)

1.   The Best Years of Our Lives (1946)

2.   Dodsworth (1936)

3.   Hell’s Heroes (1929)

4.   Counselor at Law (1933)

* * * 1/2 (Out of * * * *)

1.   The Heiress (1949)

2.   The Letter (1940)

3.   The Collector (1965)

4.   The Little Foxes (1941)

5.   Roman Holiday (1953)

6.   Jezebel (1938)

My Favorite Lucio Fulci Films

* * * * (Out of * * * *)

1.   The Beyond (1981)

2.   Four of the Apocalypse (1975)

3.   Massacre Time (1966)

* * * 1/2 (Out of * * * *)

1.   Don’t Torture a Duckling (1972)

2.   A Lizard in a Woman’s Skin (1971)

3.   One on Top of the Other (1969)
(a.k.a. Perversion Story)

John Charet’s Favorite Horror Films: Part 3 of 3

I am going to sort out the films I mentioned in my last two entries in this series (read here and here) in chronological order. I know it may be misleading to call it “Part 3 of 3” since it does not reveal anything new, but I did not know what else to call it. Either way, enjoy the list 🙂

  1. The House of the Devil (1896) (Dir: Georges Melies)
    (a.k.a. The Haunted Castle)
    (a.k.a. The Devil’s Castle)
    (Short Cinema)
  2. A Nightmare (1896) (Dir: Georges Melies)
    (Short Cinema)
  3. The Bewitched Inn (1897) (Dir: Georges Melies)
    (Short Cinema)
  4. The Astronomer’s Dream (1898) (Dir: Georges Melies)
    (Short Cinema)
  5. The Four Troublesome Heads (1898) (Dir: Georges Melies)
    (Short Cinema)
  6. Bluebeard (1901) (Dir: Georges Melies)
    (Short Cinema)
  7. The House of Ghosts (1908) (Dir: Segundo de Chomon)
    (Short Cinema)
  8. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920) (Dir: Robert Wiene)
  9. The Haunted Castle (1921) (Dir: F.W. Murnau)
  10. The Phantom Carriage (1921) (Dir: Victor Sjostrom)
  11. Haxan (1922) (Dir: Benjamin Christensen)
  12. Nosferatu (1922) (Dir: F.W. Murnau)
  13. Faust (1926) (Dir: F.W. Murnau)
  14. The Unknown (1927) (Dir: Tod Browning)
  15. Un Chien Andalou (1929) (Dir: Luis Bunuel)
    (Short Cinema)
  16. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931) (Dir: Rouben Mamoulian)
  17. Frankenstein (1931) (Dir: James Whale)
  18. Freaks (1932) (Dir: Tod Browning)
  19. Island of Lost Souls (1932) (Dir: Eric C. Kenton)
  20. The Old Dark House (1932) (Dir: James Whale)
  21. Vampyr (1932) (Dir: Carl Theodor Dreyer)
  22. The Invisible Man (1933) (Dir: James Whale)
  23. King Kong (1933) (Dir: Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack)
  24. The Black Cat (1934) (Dir: Edgar G. Ulmer)
  25. Bride of Frankenstein (1935) (Dir: James Whale)
  26. Cat People (1942) (Dir: Jacques Tourneur)
  27. The Ghost Ship (1943) (Dir: Mark Robson)
  28. I Walked with a Zombie (1943) (Dir: Jacques Tourneur)
  29. The Leopard Man (1943) (Dir: Jacques Tourneur)
  30. The Seventh Victim (1943) (Dir: Mark Robson)
  31. Bluebeard (1944) (Dir: Edgar G. Ulmer)
  32. The Curse of the Cat People (1944) (Dir: Robert Wise)
  33. The Uninvited (1944) (Dir: Lewis Allen)
  34. The Body Snatcher (1945) (Dir: Robert Wise)
  35. Dead of Night (1945) (Dir: Alberto Cavalcanti, Charles Crichton, Basil Dearden and Robert Hamer)
    (Anthology Film)
  36. Isle of the Dead (1945) (Dir: Mark Robson)
  37. The Picture of Dorian Gray (1945) (Dir: Albert Lewin)
  38. Bedlam (1946) (Dir: Mark Robson)
  39. The Spiral Staircase (1946) (Dir: Robert Siodmak)
  40. Fireworks (1947) (Dir: Kenneth Anger)
    (Short Cinema)
  41. The Queen of Spades (1949) (Dir: Thoroid Dickinson)
  42. The Man from Planet X (1951) (Dir: Edgar G. Ulmer)
  43. The Thing from Another World (1951) (Dir: Christian Nyby)
  44. House of Wax (1953) (Dir: Andre De Toth)
  45. Godzilla (1954) (Dir: Ishiro Honda)
  46. Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome (1954) (Dir: Kenneth Anger)
    (Short Cinema)
  47. Them! (1954) (Dir: Gordon Douglas)
  48. Diabolique (1955) (Dir: Henri-Georges Clouzot)
  49. Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) (Dir: Don Siegel)
  50. The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957) (Dir: Jack Arnold)
  51. Night of the Demon (1957) (Dir: Jacques Tourneur)
  52. Dracula (1958) (Dir: Terence Fisher)
    (a.k.a. Horror of Dracula)
  53. The Testament of Doctor Cordelier (1959) (Dir: Jean Renoir)
    (French TV Film)
  54. Black Sunday (1960) (Dir: Mario Bava)
  55. Eyes Without a Face (1960) (Dir: Georges Franju)
  56. The Housemaid (1960) (Dir: Kim Ki-young)
  57. Jigoku (1960) (Dir: Nobuo Nakagawa)
  58. Peeping Tom (1960) (Dir: Michael Powell)
  59. Psycho (1960) (Dir: Alfred Hitchcock)
  60. Village of the Damned (1960) (Dir: Wolf Rilla)
  61. Hercules in the Haunted World (1961) (Dir: Mario Bava)
  62. The Innocents (1961) (Dir: Jack Clayton)
  63. Carnival of Souls (1962) (Dir: Herk Harvey)
  64. Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962) (Dir: Robert Aldrich)
  65. The Birds (1963) (Dir: Alfred Hitchcock)
  66. Black Sabbath (1963) (Dir: Mario Bava)
    (Anthology Film)
  67. The Haunting (1963) (Dir: Robert Wise)
  68. Matango (1963) (Dir: Ishiro Honda)
  69. These Are the Damned (1963) (Dir: Joseph Losey)
    (a.k.a. The Damned)
  70. The Whip and the Body (1963) (Dir: Mario Bava)
  71. Blood and Black Lace (1964) (Dir: Mario Bava)
  72. Hush… Hush, Sweet Charlotte (1964) (Dir: Robert Aldrich)
  73. Kwaidan (1964) (Dir: Masaki Kobayashi)
  74. The Masque of the Red Death (1964) (Dir: Roger Corman)
  75. Onibaba (1964) (Dir: Kaneto Shindo)
  76. Planet of the Vampires (1965) (Dir: Mario Bava)
  77. Repulsion (1965) (Dir: Roman Polanski)
  78. Kill, Baby… Kill! (1966) (Dir: Mario Bava)
  79. Punch and Judy (1966) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Animated Short)
    (Short Cinema)
  80. The War of the Gargantuas (1966) (Dir: Ishiro Honda)
  81. Viy (1967) (Dir: Konstantin Yershov and Georgi Kropachyov)
  82. The Flat (1968) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Animated Short)
    (Short Cinema)
  83. Hour of the Wolf (1968) (Dir: Ingmar Bergman)
  84. Kuroneko (1968) (Dir: Kaneto Shindo)
  85. The Living Skeleton (1968) (Dir: Hiroshi Matsuno)
  86. Night of the Living Dead (1968) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  87. Rosemary’s Baby (1968) (Dir: Roman Polanski)
  88. Shogun’s Joys of Torture (1968) (Dir: Teruo Ishii)
    (Anthology Film)
  89. Spider Baby (1968) (Dir: Jack Hill)
  90. Toby Dammit (1968) (Dir: Federico Fellini)
    (Segment of Spirits of the Dead)
    (Short Cinema)
    (Anthology Film)
  91. Witchfinder General (1968) (Dir: Michael Reeves)
  92. Blind Beast (1969) (Dir: Yasuzo Masumura)
  93. Horrors of Malformed Men (1969) (Dir: Teruo Ishii)
  94. Invocation of My Demon Brother (1969) (Dir: Kenneth Anger)
    (Short Cinema)
  95. The Bird with the Crystal Plumage (1970) (Dir: Dario Argento)
  96. Hatchet for the Honeymoon (1970) (Dir: Mario Bava)
  97. The Ossuary (1970) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Documentary Short)
  98. Valerie and Her Week of Wonders (1970) (Dir: Jaromil Jires)
  99. A Bay of Blood (1971) (Dir: Mario Bava)
    (a.k.a. Twitch of the Death Nerve)
  100. The Blood on Satan’s Claw (1971) (Dir: Piers Haggard)
  101. Daughters of Darkness (1971) (Dir: Harry Kumel)
  102. The Devils (1971) (Dir: Ken Russell)
    (I watched it online)
  103. What’s the Matter with Helen? (1971) (Dir: Curtis Harrington)
  104. Whoever Slew Auntie Roo? (1971) (Dir: Curtis Harrington)
  105. The Devil (1972) (Dir: Andrzej Zulawski)
  106. Images (1972) (Dir: Robert Altman)
  107. The Last House on the Left (1972) (Dir: Wes Craven)
  108. Sisters (1972) (Dir: Brian De Palma)
  109. The Baby (1973) (Dir: Ted Post)
  110. Blood for Dracula (1973) (Dir: Paul Morrissey)
  111. The Crazies (1973) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  112. Don’t Look Now (1973) (Dir: Nicolas Roeg)
  113. The Exorcist (1973) (Dir: William Friedkin)
  114. Flesh for Frankenstein (1973) (Dir: Paul Morrissey)
  115. Ganja & Hess (1973) (Dir: Bill Gunn)
  116. Lisa and the Devil (1973) (Dir: Mario Bava)
  117. Messiah of Evil (1973) (Dir: Gloria Katz and Willard Huyck)
  118. Theatre of Blood (1973) (Dir: Douglas Hickox)
  119. The Wicker Man (1973) (Dir: Robin Hardy)
  120. Black Christmas (1974) (Dir: Bob Clark)
  121. It’s Alive (1974) (Dir: Larry Cohen)
  122. Phantom of the Paradise (1974) (Dir: Brian De Palma)
  123. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974) (Dir: Tobe Hooper)
  124. Young Frankenstein (1974) (Dir: Mel Brooks)
  125. Amelia (1975) (Dir: Dan Curtis)
    (Segment of Trilogy of Terror)
    (TV Anthology Film)
    (Short Cinema)
  126. Deep Red (1975) (Dir: Dario Argento)
  127. Shivers (1975) (Dir: David Cronenberg)
    (a.k.a. They Came from Within)
  128. Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom (1975) (Dir: Pier Paolo Pasolini)
  129. Alice, Sweet Alice (1976) (Dir: Alfred Sole)
  130. Carrie (1976) (Dir: Brian De Palma)
  131. God Told Me To (1976) (Dir: Larry Cohen)
  132. The Tenant (1976) (Dir: Roman Polanski)
  133. Castle of Otranto (1977) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Animated Short)
    (Short Cinema)
  134. Demon Seed (1977) (Dir: Donald Cammell)
  135. Eraserhead (1977) (Dir: David Lynch)
  136. Martin (1977) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  137. Rabid (1977) (Dir: David Cronenberg)
  138. Suspiria (1977) (Dir: Dario Argento)
  139. Dawn of the Dead (1978) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  140. Empire of Passion (1978) (Dir: Nagisa Oshima)
  141. The Fury (1978) (Dir: Brian De Palma)
  142. Halloween (1978) (Dir: John Carpenter)
  143. Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978) (Dir: Philip Kaufman)
  144. Someone’s Watching Me! (1978) (Dir: John Carpenter)
    (TV Film)
  145. Alien (1979) (Dir: Ridley Scott)
  146. The Brood (1979) (Dir: David Cronenberg)
  147. Legend of the Mountain (1979) (Dir: King Hu)
  148. Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979) (Dir: Werner Herzog)
  149. Phantasm (1979) (Dir: Don Coscarelli)
  150. Salem’s Lot (1979) (Dir: Tobe Hooper)
    (TV Miniseries)
  151. Altered States (1980) (Dir: Ken Russell)
  152. The Changeling (1980) (Dir: Peter Medak)
  153. The Fall of the House of Usher (1980) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Animated Short)
    (Short Cinema)
  154. The Fog (1980) (Dir: John Carpenter)
  155. Inferno (1980) (Dir: Dario Argento)
  156. The Ninth Configuration (1980) (Dir: William Peter Blatty)
  157. The Shining (1980) (Dir: Stanley Kubrick)
  158. Zigeunerweisen (1980) (Dir: Seijun Suzuki)
  159. An American Werewolf in London (1981) (Dir: John Landis)
  160. The Beyond (1981) (Dir: Lucio Fulci)
  161. The Evil Dead (1981) (Dir: Sam Raimi)
  162. Possession (1981) (Dir: Andrzej Zulawski)
  163. Scanners (1981) (Dir: David Cronenberg)
  164. Basket Case (1982) (Dir: Frank Henenlotter)
  165. Creepshow (1982) (Dir: George A. Romero)
    (Anthology Film)
  166. The Entity (1982) (Dir: Sidney J. Furie)
  167. Next of Kin (1982) (Dir: Tony Williams)
  168. Poltergeist (1982) (Dir: Tobe Hooper)
  169. Q (1982) (Dir: Larry Cohen)
  170. Tenebrae (1982) (Dir: Dario Argento)
  171. The Thing (1982) (Dir: John Carpenter)
  172. Vincent (1982) (Dir: Tim Burton)
    (Animated Short)
    (Short Cinema)
  173. The Dead Zone (1983) (Dir: David Cronenberg)
  174. Down to the Cellar (1983) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Animated Short)
    (Short Cinema)
  175. Michael Jackson: Thriller (1983) (Dir: John Landis)
    (Music Video)
    (Short Cinema)
  176. Nightmare at 20,000 Feet (1983) (Dir: George Miller)
    (Segment of Twilight Zone: The Movie)
    (Short Cinema)
    (Anthology Film)
  177. The Pendulum, the Pit and Hope (1983) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Animated Short)
    (Short Cinema)
  178. Videodrome (1983) (Dir: David Cronenberg)
  179. Frankenweenie (1984) (Dir: Tim Burton)
    (Short Cinema)
  180. A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) (Dir: Wes Craven)
  181. Day of the Dead (1985) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  182. Phenomena (1985) (Dir: Dario Argento)
  183. Re-Animator (1985) (Dir: Stuart Gordon)
  184. The Return of the Living Dead (1985) (Dir: Dan O’Bannon)
  185. The Stuff (1985) (Dir: Larry Cohen)
  186. The Fly (1986) (Dir: David Cronenberg)
  187. From Beyond (1986) (Dir: Stuart Gordon)
  188. Gothic (1986) (Dir: Ken Russell)
  189. Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (1986) (Dir: John McNaughton)
  190. Manhunter (1986) (Dir: Michael Mann)
  191. Angel Heart (1987) (Dir: Alan Parker)
  192. Bad Taste (1987) (Dir: Peter Jackson)
  193. A Chinese Ghost Story (1987) (Dir: Ching Siu-tung)
  194. Epidemic (1987) (Dir: Lars Von Trier)
  195. Evil Dead II (1987) (Dir: Sam Raimi)
  196. Hellraiser (1987) (Dir: Clive Barker)
  197. Near Dark (1987) (Dir: Kathryn Bigelow)
  198. Opera (1987) (Dir: Dario Argento)
  199. Prince of Darkness (1987) (Dir: John Carpenter)
  200. White of the Eye (1987) (Dir: Donald Cammell)
  201. Dead Ringers (1988) (Dir: David Cronenberg)
  202. Lair of the White Worm (1988) (Dir: Ken Russell)
  203. Manly Games (1988) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Animated Short)
    (Short Cinema)
  204. Monkey Shines (1988) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  205. They Live (1988) (Dir: John Carpenter)
  206. And All Through the House (1989) (Dir: Robert Zemeckis)
    (Episode of Tales from the Crypt)
    (Cable/Television)
  207. Flora (1989) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Animated Short)
    (Short Cinema)
  208. The Man Who Was Death (1989) (Dir: Walter Hill)
    (Episode of Tales from the Crypt)
    (Cable/Television)
  209. Society (1989) (Dir: Brian Yuzna)
  210. Tetsuo: The Iron Man (1989) (Dir: Shinya Tsukamoto)
  211. The Woman in Black (1989) (Dir: Herbert Wise)
    (TV Film)
  212. Cutting Cards (1990) (Dir: Walter Hill)
    (Episode of Tales from the Crypt)
    (Cable/Television)
  213. Jacob’s Ladder (1990) (Dir: Adrian Lyne)
  214. The Reflecting Skin (1990) (Dir: Philip Ridley)
  215. Two Evil Eyes (1990) (Dir: George A. Romero and Dario Argento)
    (Anthology Film)
  216. Deadline (1991) (Dir: Walter Hill)
    (Episode of Tales from the Crypt)
    (Cable/Television)
  217. Dead Wait (1991) (Dir: Tobe Hooper)
    (Episode of Tales from the Crypt)
    (Cable/Television)
  218. Foreverware (1991) (Dir: Joe Dante)
    (Episode of Eerie, Indiana)
    (Television)
  219. Hearts on a Chain (1991) (Dir: Joe Dante)
    (Episode of Eerie, Indiana)
    (Television)
  220. The Losers (1991) (Dir: Joe Dante)
    (Episode of Eerie, Indiana)
    (Television)
  221. The Retainer (1991) (Dir: Joe Dante)
    (Episode of Eerie, Indiana)
    (Television)
  222. Yellow (1991) (Dir: Robert Zemeckis)
    (Episode of Tales from the Crypt)
    (Cable/Television)
  223. Army of Darkness (1992) (Dir: Sam Raimi)
  224. Candyman (1992) (Dir: Bernard Rose)
  225. Dead Alive (1992) (Dir: Peter Jackson)
    (a.k.a. Braindead)
  226. The Hole in the Head Gang (1992) (Dir: Joe Dante)
    (Episode of Eerie, Indiana)
    (Television)
  227. Maniac at Large (1992) (Dir: John Frankenheimer)
    (Episode of Tales from the Crypt)
    (Cable/Television)
  228. On a Deadman’s Chest (1992) (Dir: William Friedkin)
    (Episode of Tales from the Crypt)
    (Cable/Television)
  229. Raising Cain (1992) (Dir: Brian De Palma)
  230. Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992) (Dir: David Lynch)
  231. Body Bags (1993) (Dir: John Carpenter and Tobe Hooper)
    (Cable Anthology Film)
  232. Cronos (1993) (Dir: Guillermo del Toro)
  233. The Dark Half (1993) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  234. In the Mouth of Madness (1994) (Dir: John Carpenter)
  235. Cemetery Man (1994) (Dir: Michele Soavi)
  236. The Kingdom (1994-1997) (Dir: Lars Von Trier)
    (TV Miniseries)
  237. You, Murderer (1995) (Dir: Robert Zemeckis)
    (Episode of Tales from the Crypt)
    (Cable/Television)
  238. Cure (1997) (Dir: Kiyoshi Kurosawa)
  239. Mimic (1997) (Dir: Guillermo del Toro)
  240. Perfect Blue (1997) (Dir: Satoshi Kon)
    (Anime)
  241. Ringu (1998) (Dir: Hideo Nakata)
  242. Vampires (1998) (Dir: John Carpenter)
  243. Audition (1999) (Dir: Takashi Miike)
  244. eXistenZ (1999) (Dir: David Cronenberg)
  245. Ravenous (1999) (Dir: Antonia Bird)
  246. Bruiser (2000) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  247. Ginger Snaps (2000) (Dir: John Fawcett)
  248. Little Otik (2000) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (a.k.a. Greedy Guts)
    (Live-Action/Animation)
  249. The Devil’s Backbone (2001) (Dir: Guillermo del Toro)
  250. Ichi the Killer (2001) (Dir: Takashi Miike)
  251. Pulse (2001) (Dir: Kiyoshi Kurosawa)
  252. Trouble Every Day (2001) (Dir: Claire Denis)
  253. Blade II (2002) (Dir: Guillermo del Toro)
  254. Bubba Ho-Tep (2002) (Dir: Don Coscarelli)
  255. Dracula: Pages from a Virgin’s Diary (2002) (Dir: Guy Maddin)
  256. May (2002) (Dir: Lucky McKee)
  257. Shaun of the Dead (2004) (Dir: Edgar Wright)
  258. Three… Extremes (2004) (Dir: Fruit Chan, Park Chan-wook and Takashi Miike)
    (Anthology Film)
  259. Cigarette Burns (2005) (Dir: John Carpenter)
    (Episode of Masters of Horror)
    (Cable/Television)
  260. The Descent (2005) (Dir: Neil Marshall)
  261. Homecoming (2005) (Dir: Joe Dante)
    (Episode of Masters of Horror)
    (Cable/Television)
  262. Incident On and Off a Mountain Road (2005) (Dir: Don Coscarelli)
    (Episode of Masters of Horror)
    (Cable/Television)
  263. Land of the Dead (2005) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  264. Lunacy (2005) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Live-Action/Animation)
  265. Bug (2006) (Dir: William Friedkin)
  266. The Host (2006) (Dir: Bong Joon-ho)
  267. Imprint (2006) (Dir: Takashi Miike)
    (Episode of Masters of Horror)
    (Cable/Television)
  268. Pick Me Up (2006) (Dir: Larry Cohen)
    (Episode of Masters of Horror)
    (Cable/Television)
  269. Sick Girl (2006) (Dir: Lucky McKee)
    (Masters of Horror Episode)
    (Cable/Television)
  270. The Woods (2006) (Dir: Lucky McKee)
  271. Diary of the Dead (2007) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  272. Inside (2007) (Dir: Julien Maury and Alexandre Bustillo)
  273. Let the Right One In (2008) (Dir: Tomas Alfredson)
  274. Antichrist (2009) (Dir: Lars Von Trier)
  275. Coraline (2009) (Dir: Henry Selick)
    (Animated Film)
  276. Drag Me to Hell (2009) (Dir: Sam Raimi)
  277. Heartless (2009) (Dir: Philip Ridley)
  278. Jennifer’s Body (2009) (Dir: Karyn Kusama)
  279. The Loved Ones (2009) (Dir: Sean Byrne)
  280. Survival of the Dead (2009) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  281. Thirst (2009) (Dir: Park Chan-wook)
  282. Let Me In (2010) (Dir: Matt Reeves)
  283. Tucker & Dale vs. Evil (2010) (Dir: Eli Craig)
  284. The Cabin in the Woods (2011) (Dir: Drew Goddard)
  285. The Skin I Live In (2011) (Dir: Pedro Almodovar)
  286. The Woman (2011) (Dir: Lucky McKee)
  287. The Babadook (2014) (Dir: Jennifer Kent)
  288. A Girl Walks Home Alone at Home (2014) (Dir: Ana Lily Amirpour)
  289. It Follows (2014) (Dir: David Robert Mitchell)
  290. What We Do in the Shadows (2014) (Dir: Jemaine Clement and Taika Waititi)
    (Mockumentary)
  291. Crimson Peak (2015) (Dir: Guillermo del Toro)
  292. The Devil’s Candy (2015) (Dir: Sean Byrne)
  293. The Invitation (2015) (Dir: Karyn Kusama)
  294. Southbound (2015) (Dir: Chad, Matt & Rob, Roxanne Benjamin, David Bruckner and Patrick Horvath)
    (Anthology Film)
  295. We Are Still Here (2015) (Dir: Ted Geoghegan)
  296. The Witch (2015) (Dir: Robert Eggers)
  297. The Love Witch (2016) (Dir: Anna Biller)
  298. Raw (2016) (Dir: Julia Ducournau)
  299. Under the Shadow (2016) (Dir: Babak Anvari)
  300. Gerald’s Game (2017) (Dir: Mike Flanagan)
  301. Get Out (2017) (Dir: Jordan Peele)
  302. Little Evil (2017) (Dir: Eli Craig)
  303. Mother! (2017) (Dir: Darren Aronofsky)
  304. XX (2017) (Dir: Jovanka Vuckovic, Annie Clark, Roxanne Benjamin and Karyn Kusama)
    (Anthology Film)
  305. Annihilation (2018) (Dir: Alex Garland)
  306. The Haunting of Hill House (2018-Present) (Dir: Mike Flanagan)
    (Netflix Anthology Series)
  307. Hereditary (2018) (Dir: Ari Aster)
  308. Mandy (2018) (Dir: Panos Cosmatos)
  309. A Quiet Place (2018) (Dir: John Krasinski)
  310. The Dead Don’t Die (2019) (Dir: Jim Jarmusch)
  311. Midsommar (2019) (Dir: Ari Aster)
  312. The Lighthouse (2019) (Dir: Robert Eggers)
  313. Ready or Not (2019) (Dir: Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett)
  314. Us (2019) (Dir: Jordan Peele)

John Charet’s Favorite Horror Films Part 2 of 3

  1. The House of Ghosts (1908) (Dir: Segundo de Chomon)
    (Short Cinema)
  2. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920) (Dir: Robert Wiene)
  3. Haxan (1922) (Dir: Benjamin Christensen)
  4. The Unknown (1927) (Dir: Tod Browning)
  5. Freaks (1932) (Dir: Tod Browning)
  6. Island of Lost Souls (1932) (Dir: Eric C. Kenton)
  7. King Kong (1933) (Dir: Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack)
  8. The Uninvited (1944) (Dir: Lewis Allen)
  9. Dead of Night (1945) (Dir: Alberto Cavalcanti, Charles Crichton, Basil Dearden and Robert Hamer)
    (Anthology Film)
  10. The Picture of Dorian Gray (1945) (Dir: Albert Lewin)
  11. The Queen of Spades (1949) (Dir: Thorold Dickinson)
  12. The Thing from Another World (1951) (Dir: Christian Nyby)
  13. Them! (1954) (Dir: Gordon Douglas)
  14. The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957) (Dir: Jack Arnold)
  15. Dracula (1958) (Dir: Terence Fisher)
    (a.k.a. Horror of Dracula)
  16. The Hound of the Baskervilles (1959) (Dir: Terence Fisher)
  17. Eyes Without a Face (1960) (Dir: Georges Franju)
  18. The Housemaid (1960) (Dir: Kim Ki-young)
  19. Jigoku (1960) (Dir: Nobuo Nakagawa)
  20. Village of the Damned (1960) (Dir: Wolf Rilla)
  21. The Innocents (1961) (Dir: Jack Clayton)
  22. Carnival of Souls (1962) (Dir: Herk Harvey)
  23. These Are the Damned (1963) (Dir: Joseph Losey)
    (a.k.a. The Damned)
  24. The Masque of the Red Death (1964) (Dir: Roger Corman)
  25. Viy (1967) (Dir: Konstantin Yershov and Georgi Kropachyov)
  26. The Living Skeleton (1968) (Dir: Hiroshi Matsuno)
  27. Spider Baby (1968) (Dir: Jack Hill)
  28. Toby Dammit (1968) (Dir: Federico Fellini)
    (Segment of “Spirts of the Dead”)
    (Anthology Film)
  29. Witchfinder General (1968) (Dir: Michael Reeves)
  30. Valerie and Her Week of Wonders (1970) (Dir: Jaromil Jires)
  31. The Blood on Satan’s Claw (1971) (Dir: Piers Haggard)
  32. Daughters of Darkness (1971) (Dir: Harry Kumel)
  33. What’s the Matter with Helen? (1971) (Dir: Curtis Harrington)
  34. Whoever Slew Auntie Roo? (1971) (Dir: Curtis Harrington)
  35. The Last House on the Left (1972) (Dir: Wes Craven)
  36. The Baby (1973) (Dir: Ted Post)
  37. Ganja & Hess (1973) (Dir: Bill Gunn)
  38. Messiah of Evil (1973) (Dir: Gloria Katz and Willard Huyck)
  39. Theatre of Blood (1973) (Dir: Douglas Hickox)
  40. The Wicker Man (1973) (Dir: Robin Hardy)
  41. Black Christmas (1974) (Dir: Bob Clark)
  42. Young Frankenstein (1974) (Dir: Mel Brooks)
  43. Amelia (1975) (Dir: Dan Curtis)
    (Short Cinema)
    (Segment of “Trilogy of Terror”)
    (TV Anthology Film) 
  44. Alice, Sweet Alice (1976) (Dir: Alfred Sole)
  45. House (1977) (Dir: Nobuhiko Obayashi)
  46. Alien (1979) (Dir: Ridley Scott)
  47. Phantasm (1979) (Dir: Don Coscarelli)
  48. The Changeling (1980) (Dir: Peter Medak)
  49. The Ninth Configuration (1980) (Dir: William Peter Blatty)
  50. An American Werewolf in London (1981) (Dir: John Landis)
  51. Basket Case (1982) (Dir: Frank Henenlotter)
  52. The Entity (1982) (Dir: Sidney J. Furie)
  53. Next of Kin (1982) (Dir: Tony Williams)
  54. Vincent (1982) (Dir: Tim Burton)
    (Short Cinema)
    (Animation)
  55. Michael Jackson’s Thriller (1983) (Dir: John Landis)
    (Short Cinema)
    (Music Video)
  56. Nightmare at 20,000 Feet (1983) (Dir: George Miller)
    (Segment of Twilight Zone: The Movie)
    (Anthology Film)
    (Short Cinema)
  57. Frankenweenie (1984) (Dir: Tim Burton)
    (Short Cinema)
  58. A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) (Dir: Wes Craven)
  59. Re-Animator (1985) (Dir: Stuart Gordon)
  60. The Return of the Living Dead (1985) (Dir: Dan O’Bannon)
  61. From Beyond (1986) (Dir: Stuart Gordon)
  62. Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (1986) (Dir: John McNaughton)
  63. Manhunter (1986) (Dir: Michael Mann)
  64. Angel Heart (1987) (Dir: Alan Parker)
  65. A Chinese Ghost Story (1987) (Dir: Ching Siu-tung)
  66. Hellraiser (1987) (Dir: Clive Barker)
  67. Society (1989) (Dir: Brian Yuzna)
  68. The Woman in Black (1989) (Dir: Herbert Wise)
    (TV Film)
  69. Jacob’s Ladder (1990) (Dir: Adrian Lyne)
  70. Two Evil Eyes (1990) (Dir: George A. Romero and Dario Argento)
    (Anthology Film)
  71. Candyman (1992) (Dir: Bernard Rose)
  72. Body Bags (1993) (Dir: John Carpenter and Tobe Hooper)
    (Anthology Cable Film)
  73. Cemetery Man (1994) (Dir: Michele Soavi)
  74. Ringu (1998) (Dir: Hideo Nakata)
  75. Ravenous (1999) (Dir: Antonia Bird)
  76. Ginger Snaps (2000) (Dir: John Fawcett)
  77. Bubba Ho-Tep (2002) (Dir: Don Coscarelli)
  78. May (2002) (Dir: Lucky McKee)
  79. Three… Extremes (2004) (Dir: Fruit Chan, Park Chan-wook and Takashi Miike) (Anthology Film)
  80. Cigarette Burns (2005) (Dir: John Carpenter)
    (Episode of Masters of Horror)
    (Cable/Television)
  81. The Descent (2005) (Dir: Neil Marshall)
  82. Incident On and Off a Mountain Road (2005) (Dir: Don Coscarelli) (Episode of Masters of Horror)
    (Cable/Television)
  83. Imprint (2006) (Dir: Takashi Miike)
    (Episode of Masters of Horror)
    (Cable/Television)
  84. Pick Me Up (2006) (Dir: Larry Cohen)
    (Episode of Masters of Horror)
    (Cable/Television)
  85. American Zombie (2007) (Dir: Grace Lee)
    (Mockumentary)
  86. Inside (2007) (Dir: Julien Maury and Alexandre Bustillo)
  87. Rec (2007) (Dir: Jaume Balaguero and Paco Plaza)
  88. Trick ‘r Treat (2007) (Dir: Michael Dougherty)
    (Anthology Film)
  89. Let the Right One In (2008) (Dir: Tomas Alfredson)
  90. Jennifer’s Body (2009) (Dir: Karyn Kusama)
  91. The Loved Ones (2009) (Dir: Sean Byrne)
  92. Splice (2009) (Dir: Vincenzo Natali)
  93. Let Me In (2010) (Dir: Matt Reeves)
  94. Tucker & Dale vs. Evil (2010) (Dir: Eli Craig)
  95. The Cabin in the Woods (2011) (Dir: Drew Goddard)
  96. The Babadook (2014) (Dir: Jennifer Kent)
  97. A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014) (Dir: Ana Lily Amirpour)
  98. It Follows (2014) (Dir: David Robert Mitchell)
  99. What We Do in the Shadows (2014) (Dir: Jemaine Clement and Taika Waititi) (Mockumentary)
  100. The Devil’s Candy (2015) (Dir: Sean Byrne)
  101. The Invitation (2015) (Dir: Karyn Kusama)
  102. Southbound (2015) (Dir: Chad, Matt & Rob, Roxanne Benjamin, David Bruckner and Patrick Horvath)
    (Anthology Film)
  103. We Are Still Here (2015) (Dir: Ted Geoghegan)
  104. The Witch (2015) (Dir: Robert Eggers)
  105. The Love Witch (2016) (Dir: Anna Biller)
  106. Raw (2016) (Dir: Julia Ducournau)
  107. Under the Shadow (2016) (Dir: Babak Anvari)
  108. Gerald’s Game (2017) (Dir: Mike Flanagan)
  109. Get Out (2017) (Dir: Jordan Peele)
  110. Little Evil (2017) (Dir: Eli Craig)
  111. Mother! (2017) (Dir: Darren Aronofsky)
  112. XX (2017) (Dir: Jovanka Vuckovic, Annie Clark, Roxanne Benjamin and Karyn Kusama)
    (Anthology Film)
  113. Annihilation (2018) (Dir: Alex Garland)
  114. Hereditary (2018) (Dir: Ari Aster)
  115. Mandy (2018) (Dir: Panos Cosmatos)
  116. A Quiet Place (2018) (Dir: John Krasinski)
  117. Midsommar (2019) (Dir: Ari Aster)
  118. Ready or Not (2019) (Dir: Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett)
  119. Us (2019) (Dir: Jordan Peele)

John Charet’s Favorite Horror Films: Part 1 of 3

Happy Halloween 2019 everybody. Since I have been so busy lately, I have decided to gather up a large number (though it is not a complete list of horror films I consider to be great) of my favorite horror films from my favorite directors and paste it on here in the alphabetical order of it’s respected director’s last name. Happy Halloween dear readers and enjoy my results below 🙂

  1. What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962) (Dir: Robert Aldrich)
  2. Hush… Hush, Sweet Charlotte (1964) (Dir: Robert Aldrich)
  3. The Skin I Live In (2011) (Dir: Pedro Almodovar)
  4. Images (1972) (Dir: Robert Altman)
  5. Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome (1954) (Dir: Kenneth Anger)
    (Short Cinema)
  6. Fireworks (1947) (Dir: Kenneth Anger)
    (Short Cinema)
  7. Invocation of My Demon Brother (1969) (Dir: Kenneth Anger)
    (Short Cinema)
  8. Deep Red (1975) (Dir: Dario Argento)
  9. Tenebrae (1982) (Dir: Dario Argento)
  10. Suspiria (1977) (Dir: Dario Argento)
  11. Opera (1987) (Dir: Dario Argento)
  12. Inferno (1980) (Dir: Dario Argento)
  13. Phenomena (1985) (Dir: Dario Argento)
  14. The Bird with the Crystal Plumage (1970) (Dir: Dario Argento)
  15. Kill, Baby… Kill! (1966) (Dir: Mario Bava)
  16. Blood and Black Lace (1964) (Dir: Mario Bava)
  17. Lisa and the Devil (1973) (Dir: Mario Bava)
  18. A Bay of Blood (1971) (Dir: Mario Bava)
    (a.k.a. Twitch of the Death Nerve)
  19. Hatchet for the Honeymoon (1970) (Dir: Mario Bava)
  20. Planet of the Vampires (1965) (Dir: Mario Bava)
  21. Black Sabbath (1963) (Dir: Mario Bava)
    (Anthology Film)
  22. Black Sunday (1960) (Dir: Mario Bava)
  23. The Whip and the Body (1963) (Dir: Mario Bava)
  24. Hercules in the Haunted World (1961) (Dir: Mario Bava)
  25. Hour of the Wolf (1968) (Dir: Ingmar Bergman)
  26. Near Dark (1987) (Dir: Kathryn Bigelow)
  27. The Host (2006) (Dir: Bong Joon-ho)
  28. Un Chien Andalou (1929) (Dir: Luis Bunuel)
    (Short Cinema)
  29. White of the Eye (1987) (Dir: Donald Cammell)
  30. Demon Seed (1977) (Dir: Donald Cammell)
  31. The Thing (1982) (Dir: John Carpenter)
  32. Halloween (1978) (Dir: John Carpenter)
  33. They Live (1988) (Dir: John Carpenter)
  34. In the Mouth of Madness (1994) (Dir: John Carpenter)
  35. The Fog (1980) (Dir: John Carpenter)
  36. Prince of Darkness (1987) (Dir: John Carpenter)
  37. Someone’s Watching Me! (1978) (Dir: John Carpenter)
    (TV Film)
  38. Vampires (1998) (Dir: John Carpenter)
  39. Cigarette Burns (2005) (Dir: John Carpenter)
    (Masters of Horror Episode)
    (Cable/Television)
  40. Diabolique (1955) (Dir: Henri-Georges Clouzot)
  41. God Told Me To (1976) (Dir: Larry Cohen)
  42. Q (1982) (Dir: Larry Cohen)
  43. It’s Alive (1974) (Dir: Larry Cohen)
  44. The Stuff (1985) (Dir: Larry Cohen)
  45. Pick Me Up (2006) (Dir: Larry Cohen)
    (Masters of Horror Episode)
    (Cable/Television)
  46. Videodrome (1983) (Dir: David Cronenberg)
  47. The Fly (1986) (Dir: David Cronenberg)
  48. Dead Ringers (1988) (Dir: David Cronenberg)
  49. The Brood (1979) (Dir: David Cronenberg)
  50. eXistenZ (1999) (Dir: David Cronenberg)
  51. The Dead Zone (1983) (Dir: David Cronenberg)
  52. Scanners (1981) (Dir: David Cronenberg)
  53. Rabid (1977) (Dir: David Cronenberg)
  54. Shivers (1975) (Dir: David Cronenberg)
    (a.k.a. They Came from Within)
  55. Homecoming (2005) (Dir: Joe Dante)
    (Masters of Horror Episode)
    (Cable/Television)
  56. Heart on a Chain (1991) (Dir: Joe Dante)
    (Episode of Eerie, Indiana)
    (Television)
  57. Foreverware (1991) (Dir: Joe Dante)
    (Episode of Eerie, Indiana)
    (Television)
  58. The Losers (1991) (Dir: Joe Dante)
    (Episode of Eerie, Indiana)
    (Television)
  59. The Hole in the Head Gang (1992) (Dir: Joe Dante)
    (Episode of Eerie, Indiana)
    (Television)
  60. The Retainer (1991) (Dir: Joe Dante)
    (Episode of Eerie, Indiana)
    (Television)
  61. The Devil’s Backbone (2001) (Dir: Guillermo del Toro)
  62. Cronos (1993) (Dir: Guillermo del Toro)
  63. Crimson Peak (2015) (Dir: Guillermo del Toro)
  64. Mimic (1997) (Dir: Guillermo del Toro)
  65. Blade II (2002) (Dir: Guillermo del Toro)
  66. Trouble Every Day (2001) (Dir: Claire Denis)
  67. The Fury (1978) (Dir: Brian De Palma)
  68. Carrie (1976) (Dir: Brian De Palma)
  69. Raising Cain (1992) (Dir: Brian De Palma)
  70. Phantom of the Paradise (1974) (Dir: Brian De Palma)
  71. Sisters (1972) (Dir: Brian De Palma)
  72. Vampyr (1932) (Dir: Carl Theodor Dreyer)
  73. The Exorcist (1973) (Dir: William Friedkin)
  74. Bug (2006) (Dir: William Friedkin)
  75. On a Deadman’s Chest (1992) (Dir: William Friedkin)
    (Episode of Tales from the Crypt)
    (Cable/Television)
  76. The Beyond (1981) (Dir: Lucio Fulci)
  77. Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979) (Dir: Werner Herzog)
  78. Cutting Cards (1990) (Dir: Walter Hill)
    (Episode of Tales from the Crypt)
    (Cable/Television)
  79. The Man Who Was Death (1989) (Dir: Walter Hill)
    (Episode of Tales from the Crypt)
    (Cable/Television)
  80. Deadline (1991) (Dir: Walter Hill)
    (Episode of Tales from the Crypt)
    (Cable/Television)
  81. The Birds (1963) (Dir: Alfred Hitchcock)
  82. Psycho (1960) (Dir: Alfred Hitchcock)
  83. Godzilla (1954) (Dir: Ishiro Honda)
  84. The War of the Gargantuas (1966) (Dir: Ishiro Honda)
  85. Matango (1963) (Dir: Ishiro Honda)
  86. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974) (Dir: Tobe Hooper)
  87. Salem’s Lot (1979) (Dir: Tobe Hooper)
    (TV Miniseries)
  88. Poltergeist (1982) (Dir: Tobe Hooper)
  89. Legend of the Mountain (1979) (Dir: King Hu)
  90. Horrors of Malformed Men (1969) (Dir: Teruo Ishii)
  91. Shogun’s Joys of Torture (1968) (Dir: Teruo Ishii)
    (Anthology Film)
  92. Dead Alive (1992) (Dir: Peter Jackson)
    (a.k.a. Braindead)
  93. Bad Taste (1987) (Dir: Peter Jackson)
  94. The Dead Don’t Die (2019) (Dir: Jim Jarmusch)
  95. Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978) (Dir: Philip Kaufman)
  96. Kwaidan (1964) (Dir: Masaki Kobayashi)
  97. Perfect Blue (1997) (Dir: Satoshi Kon)
    (Anime)
  98. The Shining (1980) (Dir: Stanley Kubrick)
  99. Pulse (2001) (Dir: Kiyoshi Kurosawa)
  100. Cure (1997) (Dir: Kiyoshi Kurosawa)
  101. Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992) (Dir: David Lynch)
  102. Eraserhead (1977) (Dir: David Lynch)
  103. Dracula: Pages from a Virgin’s Diary (2002) (Dir: Guy Maddin)
  104. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931) (Dir: Rouben Mamoulian)
  105. Blind Beast (1969) (Dir: Yasuzo Masumura)
  106. May (2002) (Dir: Lucky McKee)
  107. The Woman (2011) (Dir: Lucky McKee)
  108. The Woods (2006) (Dir: Lucky McKee)
  109. Sick Girl (2006) (Dir: Lucky McKee)
    (Masters of Horror Episode)
    (Cable/Television)
  110. The Astronomer’s Dream (1898) (Dir: Georges Melies)
    (Short Cinema)
  111. The Bewitched Inn (1897) (Dir: Georges Melies)
    (Short Cinema)
  112. Bluebeard (1901) (Dir: Georges Melies)
    (Short Cinema)
  113. The Four Troublesome Heads (1898) (Dir: Georges Melies)
    (Short Cinema)
  114. The House of the Devil (1896) (Dir: Georges Melies)
    (a.k.a. The Haunted Castle)
    (a.k.a. The Devil’s Castle)
    (Short Cinema)
  115. A Nightmare (1896) (Dir: Georges Melies)
    (Short Cinema)
  116. Audition (1999) (Dir: Takashi Miike)
  117. Ichi the Killer (2001) (Dir: Takashi Miike)
  118. Imprint (2006) (Dir: Takashi Miike)
    (Masters of Horror)
    (Cable/Television)
  119. Flesh for Frankenstein (1973) (Dir: Paul Morrissey)
  120. Blood for Dracula (1973) (Dir: Paul Morrissey)
  121. Nosferatu (1922) (Dir: F.W. Murnau)
  122. Faust (1926) (Dir: F.W. Murnau)
  123. The Haunted Castle (1921) (Dir: F.W. Murnau)
  124. Empire of Passion (1978) (Dir: Nagisa Oshima)
  125. Thirst (2009) (Dir: Park Chan-wook)
  126. Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom (1975) (Dir: Pier Paolo Pasolini)
  127. The Tenant (1976) (Dir: Roman Polanski)
  128. Repulsion (1965) (Dir: Roman Polanski)
  129. Rosemary’s Baby (1968) (Dir: Roman Polanski)
  130. Peeping Tom (1960) (Dir: Michael Powell)
  131. Evil Dead II (1987) (Dir: Sam Raimi)
  132. The Evil Dead (1981) (Dir: Sam Raimi)
  133. Drag Me to Hell (2009) (Dir: Sam Raimi)
  134. Army of Darkness (1992) (Dir: Sam Raimi)
  135. The Testament of Doctor Cordelier (1959) (Dir: Jean Renoir)
    (French TV Film)
  136. The Reflecting Skin (1990) (Dir: Philip Ridley)
  137. Heartless (2009) (Dir: Philip Ridley)
  138. The Seventh Victim (1943) (Dir: Mark Robson)
  139. Isle of the Dead (1945) (Dir: Mark Robson)
  140. Bedlam (1946) (Dir: Mark Robson)
  141. The Ghost Ship (1943) (Dir: Mark Robson)
  142. Don’t Look Now (1973) (Dir: Nicolas Roeg)
  143. Dawn of the Dead (1978) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  144. Night of the Living Dead (1968) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  145. Martin (1977) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  146. Day of the Dead (1985) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  147. Land of the Dead (2005) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  148. Creepshow (1982) (Dir: George A. Romero)
    (Anthology Film)
  149. The Crazies (1973) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  150. Bruiser (2000) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  151. Diary of the Dead (2007) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  152. The Dark Half (1993) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  153. Survival of the Dead (2009) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  154. Monkey Shines (1988) (Dir: George A. Romero)
  155. The Devils (1971) (Dir: Ken Russell)
    (I watched it online)
  156. Altered States (1980) (Dir: Ken Russell)
  157. Lair of the White Worm (1988) (Dir: Ken Russell)
  158. Gothic (1986) (Dir: Ken Russell)
  159. Coraline (2009) (Dir: Henry Selick) (Animated Film)
  160. Kuroneko (1968) (Dir: Kaneto Shindo)
  161. Onibaba (1964) (Dir: Kaneto Shindo)
  162. Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) (Dir: Don Siegel)
  163. The Spiral Staircase (1946) (Dir: Robert Siodmak)
  164. The Phantom Carriage (1921) (Dir: Victor Sjostrom)
  165. Zigeunerweisen (1980) (Dir: Seijun Suzuki)
  166. Little Otik (2000) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (a.k.a. Greedy Guts)
    (Live-Action/Animation)
  167. Lunacy (2005) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Live-Action/Animation)
  168. The Pendulum, the Pit and Hope (1983) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Animated Short)
  169. Down to the Cellar (1983) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Animated Short)
  170. The Flat (1968) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Animated Short)
  171. Manly Games (1988) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Animated Short)
  172. Punch and Judy (1966) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Animated Short)
  173. The Ossuary (1970) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Documentary Short)
  174. The Fall of the House of Usher (1980) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Animated Short)
  175. Castle of Otranto (1977) (Dir: Jan Svankmajer)
    (Animated Short)
  176. Flora (1989) (Dir: Jan Svankmaker)
    (Animated Short)
  177. House of Wax (1953) (Dir: Andre De Toth)
  178. Cat People (1942) (Dir: Jacques Tourneur)
  179. I Walked with a Zombie (1943) (Dir: Jacques Tourneur)
  180. Night of the Demon (1957) (Dir: Jacques Tourneur)
  181. The Leopard Man (1943) (Dir: Jacques Tourneur)
  182. The Man from Planet X (1951) (Dir: Edgar G Ulmer)
  183. The Black Cat (1934) (Dir: Edgar G. Ulmer)
  184. Bluebeard (1944) (Dir: Edgar G. Ulmer)
  185. Antichrist (2009) (Dir: Lars Von Trier)
  186. The Kingdom (1994-1997) (Dir: Lars Von Trier)
    (TV Miniseries)
  187. Epidemic (1987) (Dir: Lars Von Trier)
  188. Bride of Frankenstein (1935) (Dir: James Whale)
  189. The Old Dark House (1932) (Dir: James Whale)
  190. The Invisible Man (1933) (Dir: James Whale)
  191. Frankenstein (1931) (Dir: James Whale)
  192. The Haunting (1963) (Dir: Robert Wise)
  193. The Curse of the Cat People (1944) (Dir: Robert Wise)
  194. The Body Snatcher (1945) (Dir: Robert Wise)
  195. Shaun of the Dead (2004) (Dir: Edgar Wright)
  196. Yellow (1991) (Dir: Robert Zemeckis)
    (Episode of Tales from the Crypt)
    (Cable/Television)
  197. And All Through the House (1989) (Dir: Robert Zemeckis)
    (Episode of Tales from the Crypt)
    (Cable/Television)
  198. You, Murderer (1995) (Dir: Robert Zemeckis)
    (Episode of Tales from the Crypt)
    (Cable/Television)
  199. Possession (1981) (Dir: Andrzej Zulawski)
  200. The Devil (1972) (Dir: Andrzej Zulawski)

John Charet’s Take On: Night of the Living Dead (1968)

Warning: The following review contains potential spoilers. If you have not seen the film yet, than I strongly advise to not go any further.

Filmed in black-and-white on a low-budget reportedly consisting of $114,000 dollars, Night of the Living Dead proved to be a success with both audiences, and eventually critics nationwide. In addition to all of that, it not only served as George A. Romero’s directorial debut, but at the same time, it also cemented his reputation (and deservedly so) as a master of horror amongst devotees of the genre like myself.

During a visit to their father’s grave at a cemetery, siblings Barbra (Judith O’Dea) and Johnny (an uncredited Russell Streiner) notice a dazed looking man walking awkwardly. When he tries to attack Barbra, Johnny intervenes by fighting back. Nevertheless, this backfires as the man fatally throws Johnny against a gravestone. Running for her life, Barbra seeks shelter inside a farmhouse that looks as If it has been deserted. Upon entering the upstairs area, Barbra discovers a seemingly devoured corpse leaving her terrified and ready to leave. Suddenly, an African-American by the name of Ben (Duane Jones) enters the place and defends it by killing two of the monstrous strangers with a tire iron. Although, Ben is able to persuade her to help him board up the entire house, Barbra’s mental state has deteriorated considerably due to everything that she has just witnessed. Semi-ignorant of her current state of shock, Ben tells Barbra that he first witnessed all of his chaos while passing by a local diner. In his words, he talks to her about how he went inside an abandoned truck so he could listen to the radio and remain informed on the current situation. While in there, he saw a bunch of these strange people chasing after a gasoline truck, which drove right through a billboard resulting in the driver’s death. Afterwards, Ben looked around and realized that he was allegedly the only person left alive and to survive, he would seek solace in someplace that was safe. Barbra summarizes everything that happened to her at the cemetery prior to hiding out in the farmhouse that she is currently sharing with Ben. Under the false impression that her brother Johnny is still alive, Barbra tries to convince Ben to go out and look for him. Ben quickly dismissed this idea by simply stating that your brother is dead resulting in a hysterical Barbra to reply back with  No! My brother is not dead! and after slapping him, he smacks her back intending to shake some common sense into her, but ends up leaving her incapacitated.

Armed with a hunting rifle that he had found in the farmhouse, Ben uses it to fend off attacks from the outside while listening for the next radio report. Unexpectedly, the cellar door opens awakening Barbra and slightly startling Ben, who discovers that a few others have survived. We are introduced to a teenager named Tom (Keith Wayne) and an arrogant and unhappily married father/husband by the name of Harry Cooper (Karl Hardman), who is unrelated to him. Tom’s teenage girlfriend Judy (Judith Ridley) is in the cellar assisting Harry’s wife Helen (Marilyn Eastman) in any way she can with her and Harry’s ailing 11-year-old daughter Karen (Kyra Schon), who was bitten by one of the attackers. Harry and his family are hiding in the farmhouse because their car was turned over by the same freaks encountered earlier on by Barbra and Ben. Tom and Judy   sought refuge in the house after hearing about the recent string of murders from a radio report via an emergency broadcast from earlier. Shortly after discovering a television set somewhere in the house, Ben turns it on to listen to the next report with most (If not all) of the others and learns that this nationwide epidemic of murderous mayhem began when the deceased unexplainably came back to life and started feasting upon human flesh. One scientist thinks that this recent outbreak may have originated from a Venus space probe that exploded in the Earth’s atmosphere. According to a local Sheriff, the most effective way to kill these reanimated corpses is to aim for the head with either a gun, a club or a torch. As the number of zombies become more widespread, Ben fends them off while simultaneously plotting an escape route with the full cooperation of everyone around him with the exception of the selfish Harry.

Director/co-writer George A. Romero may have cited Richard Matheson’s 1954 novel I Am Legend (read herehere, and here) as an inspiration, but it would be unwise for anybody to sum up Night of the Living Dead as a pastiche of past horror fiction (cinematic or literary) since the result is the complete opposite. In terms of plot, it is most notable for being the first film to depict zombies (read here) as flesh-eating monsters. Succeeding Arthur Penn’s Bonnie and Clyde and preceding Sam Peckinpah’s The Wild Bunch both by a year, the violence in Night of the Living Dead (like the former and the latter) was noticeably more graphic than anything else viewers had seen in the past. Unlike those first two titles however, this one was an independent film distributed by the lower-profiled Water Reade Organization (read here), a once high-profile movie theater chain. Aside from a considerably gory stabbing, a crushed skull and the decomposed face of a corpse, we also get zombies completely devouring human beings.

At heart, Night of the Living Dead also works as a biting satire on the political and social turmoil that ended up shaping the 1960’s as a whole. Not unlike The Wild Bunch, Night of the Living Dead’s display of graphic violence (strong for it’s day at least) was symbolic of the American news media’s daily televised depictions of the ongoing Vietnam War overseas (read here), which the United States was heavily involved in at the time. Taking into account the continued escalation of U.S. involvement (read here) during the then presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson (1963-1969), one can’t help but possibly see this as a fitting metaphor. One could also potentially see a parallel between the killings of the zombies and the protest activity that erupted at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago (read here and here) with the posse of armed men in the roles of the police officers upholding law and order by physically restraining them. While privately understanding of their anger, the police (alluding to the posse) feel that it would be a dangerous mistake for protesters (alluding to the zombies) to let that emotion influence them to cause chaos and destruction. If Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds served in part as an allegory of the decline of the nuclear family (read here), than director George A. Romero’s Night of the Living Dead symbolically serves as one about it’s demise. For example, Harry and Helen Cooper’s marriage is obviously an unhappy one judging from Helen’s remark to Harry of we may not enjoy living together, but dying together isn’t going to solve anything. According to Helen, it is important for her egotistical husband to be right and for everybody else to be wrong. Fairly or unfairly, it seems that dysfunctional families like these have only become more common since the passage of no-fault divorce the following year in 1969 by then California governor (1967-1975) and future 40th U.S. President (1981-1989) Ronald W. Reagan (read here and here), who would later reportedly cite this as the biggest mistake of his political career. By 1985, all except one state had some form of it and by 2010, New York would become the last state to pass a no-fault divorce law (read here). Explicitly, the already insecure Harry resents taking orders from Ben, who (along with Helen) hates him due to his arrogance and bullying. Implicitly, Harry harbors a racial hatred for the African-American Ben, who is almost killed by the zombies when Harry purposely locks him outside. Later on, Ben gets his revenge by shooting him with the hunting rifle. Open or closeted, Harry’s racism was typical to that of extreme critics of the Civil rights movement (1954-1968) (read here). By the end, just as it looks as If Ben is going to be the lone survivor, he is unexpectedly shot in the head long range by a posse member, who had mistaken him for a zombie. This ending resembles the pessimism that drove the mood of the nation following two 1968 assassinations on political leaders in the form of civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4 of that year (read here) and then New York senator turned Presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy (read here) two months later on June 5. The eerie music that plays during the closing credits foreshadows the two turbulent events that followed in the guise of the King assassination riots (read here) and the aforementioned protest activity that occurred at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago of that same year. Romero’s vision of a radically changing America is made all the more terrifying when one comes to the realization that most (if not all) of these incidents were taking place between early April and late August of that year; prior to the film’s premiere during that month of October.

While I personally feel that director George A. Romero would surpass this one 10 years later with the gorier and wittier Dawn of the Dead in 1978, Night of the Living Dead is still truly deserving of it’s status as an influential cult classic. Even at the tender age of 50, it feels every bit as scary and timeless now as it was in 1968. To put it in other words, Night of the Living Dead is a horror film with a lot on it’s mind.

-(Star Rating)-
* * * * (Out of * * * *)

John Charet’s Take On: The Birds (1963)

Warning: The review contains potential plot spoilers. If you have not seen this film than I advise you to not read any further.

Three years after he reinvented cinematic horror with Psycho in 1960, director Alfred Hitchcock (a.k.a. The Master of Suspense) would return to that genre in 1963 to do it again; this time with something more ambitious and on a much larger scale as well. The finished result was The Birds and with it, Hitchcock succeeded in not only equaling and surpassing his aforementioned previous effort, but at the same time, everything he did before and after this. If I were to compose two lists of my top 100 or more favorite films of all-time; with one dedicated to the horror genre and the other towards cinema as a whole, I would place The Birds at the number 1 spot on the former and somewhere in between numbers 1 and 10 on the latter.

While visiting an urban pet store one day to pick up a mynah bird for a relative, San Francisco socialite Melanie Daniels (Tippi Hedren) gets mistaken by a customer (Rod Taylor) for a saleswoman and requests a pair of lovebirds for his little sister’s 11th birthday party. As with the mynah bird, it turns out that the shop is out of lovebirds, so Melanie suggests a canary, which flies out of her hand after taking it out of it’s cage. After catching the canary with his hat, the still unnamed customer places the bird back in it’s cage and says: “back in your gilded cage Melanie Daniels.” A stunned Daniels asks him how he knew her name and it is revealed that he saw her in court. According to him, she was responsible for a practical joke that resulted in a broken glass window and personally feels that she should have been sent to jail for it. He purposely knew from the very beginning that Daniels was no saleswoman and reveals that it was his way of reminding her of “what it’s like to be on the other end of a gag” as he puts it. Undetered by not getting his lovebirds, he leaves with two closing remarks to Daniels: “I’ll find something else” and “see ya in court.” An annoyed Daniels decides to write down the number of the license plate on that customer’s car and calls the Department of Motor Vehicles to find out the name of the individual who owns it. In an attempt to get even with him, Daniels asks the pet shop owner to order a pair of lovebirds for her and have them delivered as soon as possible, which in this case would be the next morning.

The next day, Melanie Daniels arrives at the apartment building to place a birdcage (with the two lovebirds inside) on a doorstep with a note addressing that customer’s real name as “Mr. Mitchell Brenner.” Before leaving, a neighbor of his reminds her that he is visiting Bodega Bay, which is up the coast from San Francisco. Eager to get even with Mitch, Melanie drives up there and visits a local store to see If it’s owner knows where Mitch is residing for the weekend. Coincidentally, he knows the location of the place, which is across the dock seen close by. He knows that it belongs to his mother, but when asked about Mitch’s younger sister, he cannot seem to remember her first name. Nevertheless, he is able to direct her to a local schoolteacher by the name of Annie Hayworth (Suzanne Pleshette), who not only teaches Mitch’s younger sister, but also reveals herself to be Mitch’s ex-lover much later on. Upon learning that Cathy is the name of Mitch’s younger sibling, Melanie rents a motorboat to get to Mitch’s house to deliver her surprise. After placing the caged lovebirds on a comfy chair, Melanie tears up her original note for Mitch and replaces it with one carrying the words “To: Cathy” on it. Unofficially, Melanie hopes to shock Mitch with her knowledge of a family member’s identity much in the same way he did with hers the day before. Melanie rushes out of the house and back to her motorboat to see how Mitch will react when he inevitably goes back inside. Seemingly amused and curious, Mitch drives to the other side of the dock and gets out of his car to see what she will either say to him or do next. Suddenly, a seagull flies down and quickly attacks Melanie on the forehead prompting Mitch to help her out of the boat and treat her wound.

At the local diner, while treating her injury, Mitch Brenner reveals to Melanie Daniels that he is a criminal defense attorney, who practices law in San Francisco, but comes to Bodega Bay on the weekends to relax. After asking her why she is in the area, Melanie tells a lie and a half. Considering that Mitch is unaware of it being a prank yet humored and touched by the deed at the same time, Melanie tells him that she wanted to deliver the lovebirds for his little sister’s birthday. Deep down though, Melanie saw Mitch as a potential boyfriend ever since that first coincidental meeting at the pet store the day before. Even though Melanie denies it publicly, Mitch personally feels that she is in Bodega Bay to see him. Is it possible that Mitch could care less about her earlier prank and only got even with her that previous day so she could come to Bodega Bay to see him?  The other lie Melanie tells Mitch is that she is visiting to see local schoolteacher Annie Hayworth (a.k.a. his ex-lover) by claiming that she and her were friends during their college years.  Later that night, Melanie reluctantly accepts Mitch’s invitation to dinner to meet his younger sister Cathy (Veronica Cartwright), who adores both Melanie and the lovebirds she bought her and his widowed mother Lydia (Jessica Tandy), who initially fears her presence. As Ms. Daniels is about to leave to spend the night with Annie, a curious Mitch asks her to talk a bit more about herself in regards to a story brought up by Lydia earlier regarding Melanie frolicking naked in a waterfall while vacationing in Rome, Italy. Melanie claims that she was dumped in there with her clothes on and that the article his mother was referring to was written by a columnist hired by a rival of her father’s newspaper company to slander her family. Still unsatisfied, Mitch wants to know why she lied to him about knowing Annie resulting in an already annoyed Melanie to quickly drive away from him for a short period of time.

Later on at Annie Hayworth’s house, a curious Melanie Daniels asks Annie about her past relationship with Mitch Brenner, whom she was madly in love with at one time. According to Annie, she still desires a romantic relationship with him, but his overprotective mother Lydia just kept getting in the way and it eventually proved to be too much for her to take. Suddenly, Mitch phone calls Melanie to sincerely apologize for his earlier behavior and to make it up to her, he decides to officially invite her to celebrate his little sister Cathy’s 11th birthday party for the following day. Thinking back and forth for a while, Melanie decides to go. Shortly before both of them go to bed, a loud noise is heard from the outside. After opening the door to see what it is, Annie and Melanie discover a dead seagull on the front step. This is just the third strange occurrence that has plagued Bodega Bay since Melanie arrived. The first incident came earlier in the form of a seagull briefly attacking Melanie on the forehead and the second one involved the town’s chicken feed and why the chickens were not eating it. The next day at Cathy’s birthday party, numerous birds begin to violently attack the party guests and shortly after that, Mitch fends off a bird attack within his own home. From here on out, these incidents prove to be just two of the numerous attacks the birds will launch on the town and it’s inhabitants.

On the surface, The Birds plays out as a standard horror film about humans being attacked by the title villains. Nevertheless, in the hands of it’s iconic director and producer Alfred Hitchcock, it inevitably goes much deeper than that. Along with Vertigo and Psycho, this one requires viewers to pay close attention to every single detail that unfolds on screen from beginning to end. Not unlike what he had achieved with those two classics, Hitchcock proves once again here that the power of cinematic storytelling lies not so much in the payoff as it does in the buildup. While this can easily be said about any of the master filmmaker’s best work, it is in The Birds where Hitchcock finds himself reaching his fullest expression of that particular trait.

As much as I adore Jamaica Inn and Rebecca, The Birds still ranks for me as my favorite of director Alfred Hitchcock’s three film adaptations of a Daphne du Maurier property. Instead of merely adapting du Maurier’s 1952 novelette of the same name, Hitchcock simply reimagines it by using a 1961 Santa Cruz Sentinel article as “research material for his latest thriller”. – (read here). The piece itself was about a large number of seabirds unexplainably attacking the city of Capitola, California on August 18th of that year. Eventually, it turned out that the birds may have been “under the influence of domoic acid” (read here) at the time of the attacks. To further expand upon this idea, Hitchcock hired famed crime/mystery fiction writer Evan Hunter (a.k.a. Ed McBain) to write a screenplay that would effortlessly move from one tone into another. All through the first half-hour, viewers are intentionally tricked into thinking that the mood is going to play out like a sophisticated romantic comedy based on the playful banter between Melanie Daniels and Mitch Brenner. Thirty minutes into the film, that feeling more or less dissipates as it turns into something resembling a psychological drama that expands upon and rivals Psycho in it’s depiction of the darker side of a mother and son relationship. Finally, seven minutes before the second hour, it ultimately becomes an apocalyptic horror movie and a truly terrifying one at that. Hitchcock seemed to believe so himself based on the film’s legendary trailer (see below), which among other things, visually illustrates the question of “WHAT IS THE SHOCKING MYSTERY OF THE BIRDS?” across the screen. Unlike Hitchcock’s other films though, the mystery of The Birds remains unsolved and in a stroke of genius, Hitchcock and Hunter leave it up to viewers to answer the question for themselves.

Symbolically and thematically, The Birds is mainly a film about complacency as seen from director Alfred Hitchcock’s point-of-view (read here). I agree, but I am going to go one step beyond with not one, but two debatably complex interpretations. Prior to 1970, or maybe even five years earlier, one’s own praise of The Birds as Hitchcock’s most elaborate prank to date would be doing it complete justice. On the one hand, he is subtly thumbing his nose at upper class society by using the Melanie Daniels character as his target. True, Melanie may not have literally delivered the resulting chaos, but she might have done so figuratively in the form of her harmless prank involving the delivery of two lovebirds. The hysterical mother in the diner summed it up best when she said “I think you’re the cause of all of this. I think you’re evil. EVIL!” Later on and in a strange twist of irony, the birds viciously attack Melanie and this possibly gives off the vibe that her prank has backfired. On the other hand, Hitchcock does not seem too fond of small town sanctimony either. Since the plot already deals with birds violently attacking residents of a tiny village, Hitchcock is now officially left with doing nothing else but sitting back and enjoying the show like the rest of us.

Taking into consideration all of the radical changes that shaped the decade as it continued and ended, The Birds also comes off as a film that eerily foreshadowed the death of early 1960’s optimism and the slow, but steady decline of the nuclear family in a rather symbolic way. The lighthearted elements that defined the first half hour quite possibly resembles the stereotypical cheery mood that preceding American President Dwight D. Eisenhower (1953-1961) passed on to his successor John F. Kennedy (1961-1963), who briefly upheld this notion in the earlier days of his presidency. Contrary to the first 30 minutes, the second half hour carries a cautiously optimistic tone as we learn more about the characters. This unexpected feeling of cynicism coincides perfectly with the notable disappointments of the Kennedy era that include the failed 1961 Bay of Pigs Invasion (read here), his escalation of the Vietnam War beginning that same year (read here) and to some extent, the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis (read here). Shortly after turning into a horror movie near the end of the first hour, viewers get a fairly graphic glimpse of the birds first casualty by way of a neighboring farmer. Psychologically, our terrified reactions at this sight mirrors that of the American public’s when Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas on November 22nd, 1963 (read here). Amid all of these previous events, the status of the nuclear family suddenly began to deteriorate. Two characters in The Birds demonstrate this aspect quite powerfully. In the case of Melanie Daniels, we get a wealthy woman, who admits to Mitch Brenner that her mother ditched her and her father when she was 11 years-old for “some hotel man in the East” before getting briefly emotional about her revelation. The other one comes in the form of Mitch’s widowed mother Lydia, who wishes that she “was a stronger person.” While sipping on a cup of tea, she laments to Melanie about how much she misses her husband (whom she reveals as Frank), who was not only able to connect with Mitch and Cathy on so many levels, but whose presence always gave her a sense of security deep down. Ever since his death from four years back, Lydia has felt insecure and she painfully admits to Melanie that “it’s terrible how you, you depend on someone else for strength and then suddenly all the strength is gone and you’re alone.” In many ways, Lydia can’t help but remain dependent on Mitch because she does not want him to abandon her given how she implicitly looks upon her recent self as that of a failure. When Lydia becomes anxious on the status of the bird attacks, Mitch comes to feel like one himself when she expresses all of her worries and all he can say is “I don’t know.” A hysterical Lydia than screams something along the lines of “If only your father were here” before sincerely apologizing to him a few seconds later. One scene visually expresses this by having Mitch sitting down in front of a portrait that may be his late father. While Melanie, Lydia and Cathy are sitting down waiting for the radio news report, he sits there looking like he is struggling to be as larger than life as his father apparently was. Unlike Norman Bates in Psycho, Mitch does not really see himself as a mama’s boy. While he does love Lydia (his mother) with all his heart, at the same time, he yearns for a social life. Unfortunately, Lydia is always preventing this by interfering with his relationships like the one he had with Annie Hayworth earlier. Speaking of which, some viewers have suggested that the bird attacks represent Lydia’s rage at any woman, who attempts to form a romantic relationship with Mitch. One could even say that the ending may imply that Lydia has come to grips with accepting Mitch’s desire for a social life. This occurs in that last scene in the car where Lydia is warmly looking upon Melanie, whose head is resting on her shoulder. Based on what viewers know about Melanie’s family life, it looks like her implied wish of “a mother’s love” has finally come true. Considering all of the political and social turmoil that ended up defining that decade as a whole, The Birds strangely but subtlety comes off as something of a spiritual prequel to George A. Romero’s similarly apocalyptic (albeit lower-budgeted) horror classic Night of the Living Dead from five years later in 1968.

If Psycho served as director Alfred Hitchcock’s definition of a horror film, then The Birds serves as his redefinition of that genre. Unlike the majority of his previous films, Hitchcock uses very little music this time around to build suspense. We notice this from the opening title sequence set to nothing but the squawks of birds, who fly all over the place tearing apart each new credit a few seconds after they initially appear on the screen. Aside from sound effects, Hitchcock utilizes editing and special effects to tell the story. This is most noticeable during the last 67 minutes of the film’s 119-minute running time. The first bird attack on the town occurs at a children’s birthday party and as edited by Hitchcock’s regular editor George Tomasini, we get fast (but not too fast) back and forth cuts to emphasize all of the chaos that will embody the remainder of the film. The second major example comes when Melanie Daniels is sitting on a bench waiting for Cathy to get out of school. While the schoolchildren are heard inside singing “Risseldy Rosseldy” (read here), Melanie frequently stares back and forth at the playground and with each stare, she sees more and more crows sitting on the equipment with menacing looks on their faces. Much like the previous scene, the birds attack everybody including the children. Next up, birds attack a gas station resulting in leaking gasoline and after a man unknowingly throws a cigarette on the ground, he and the place explodes resulting in the  diner patrons to run for their lives. As Melanie hides within the telephone booth, she witnesses birds attacking a horse carriage, a man inside his car and another man getting pecked to death by birds themselves. After witnessing each instance terror, the camera cuts back and forth to a frightened Melanie. During the climax, Melanie opens a room and finds herself being pecked by an army of birds leaving her badly wounded If not dead. This sequence works as a companion piece to Psycho’s iconic shower scene based on it’s frenzied editing style. Last, but not least, credit should also be given to it’s photographic visual effects courtesy of Ub Iwerks (read here). Despite being made over 55 years ago, the imagery of the birds themselves still look timeless. Sometimes, the creatures come off as credibly scary (i.e. the crows) and other times, they look (deceivingly) harmless (i.e. the seagulls).

Along with The Shining from 17 years later, The Birds is a masterpiece of cinematic horror that allows viewers to form their own interpretations of everything they had just seen. In addition to all of that, I see The Birds as more than just my number one choice for the greatest horror film of all-time. To go one step even further, I would rank it somewhere within the top 10 range of my still unpublished blog entry of the 100 (or more) best films ever made according to me.

-(Star Rating)-
* * * * (Out of * * * *)

P.S. In case, you are interested, here is a link to the trailer of Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds, which Hitchcock promoted in a way that was similar to Psycho from three years earlier.