Moviedrome Mondays: Play Misty for Me (1971)

I have posted a youtube video link below to Moviedrome presenter Alex Cox’s introduction to Clint Eastwood’s 1971 directorial debut Play Misty for Me. Readers can also read Cox’s intro transcript here. The episode’s original airdate was August 9, 1992 (read here). Cox’s commentary here is too fascinating for me to delve into, so let me just say that Play Misty for Me not only benefits from the self-assured direction of it’s lead star (Eastwood), but also from Jessica Walter’s memorable performance as the psychotic fan turned stalker of Eastwood’s character. If any of you readers are interested, here is a link to my favorite films directed by Clint Eastwood (read here).

Here is a youtube video link to Alex Cox’s Moviedrome intro to Play Misty for Me

Here is a youtube video link to the film’s original theatrical trailer

Moviedrome Mondays: Lolita (1962)

Since I could not find a youtube video link of Moviedrome presenter Alex Cox introducing legendary master filmmaker Stanley Kubrick’s 1962 black comedy-drama Lolita, readers will have to rely on Cox’s intro transcript (read here). The episode’s original airdate was August 2, 1992 (read here). While I may strongly disagree with Cox’s lambasting of Kubrick’s then previous two films (I loved both The Shining and Full Metal Jacket), I do nod in agreement with him regarding Lolita – though I personally think that I may love the film more than he does. Given that Lolita is loosely based on literary giant Vladimir Nabokov’s equally controversial 1955 bestseller of the same name, it truly is surprising that Kubrick’s 1962 adaptation, though tame compared to the book, works as tremendously as it does. Kudos especially to it’s lead actors, which include James Mason as Humbert Humbert, Shelley Winters as Charlotte Haze-Humbert, Sue Lyon as Dolores “Lolita” Haze and especially Peter Sellers as Clare Quilty. If any of you readers are interested, here is a link to my favorite Stanley Kubrick films (read here).

Here is a youtube video link to the film’s original theatrical trailer

Moviedrome Mondays: Wise Blood (1979) and Witchfinder General (1968)

This week presents yet another Moviedrome Monday double bill entry.

Wise Blood (1979)

Since I could not find a youtube video link of Moviedrome presenter Alex Cox introducing legendary director John Huston’s 1979 late career masterpiece Wise Blood, readers will have to rely on Cox’s intro transcript (read here). The episode’s original airdate was July 26, 1992 (read here). My number one favorite Huston film is (as a few others have proclaimed first) is simultaneously funny, insightful and original. Needless to say, it feels more like the work of a fresh-faced 22 year-old filmmaker as opposed to that of a then 72 year-old. If any of you readers are interested, here is a link to my favorite John Huston films (read here).

Here is a youtube video link to the film’s original theatrical trailer


Witchfinder General (1968)

I have posted a youtube video link below to Moviedrome presenter Alex Cox’s introduction to director Michael Reeves 1968 low-budget cult historical horror classic Witchfinder General. Readers can also read Cox’s intro transcript here. The episode’s original airdate was July 27, 1992 (read here). In contrast to Cox’s surprisingly lukewarm take, I found Witchfinder General to be deserving of all it’s praise. On the surface, Witchfinder General is a scenic period piece with a suitable music score by Paul Ferris. At it’s center, Witchfinder General subtly examines opportunism in the name of religion coinciding perfectly with Vincent Price’s fittingly understated performance as the opportunistic title character – the evil real-life Matthew Hopkins. Last, but not least, the film generated controversy in the UK during it’s initial 1968 theatrical run due to it’s then shocking graphic depiction of violence (read here).

Here is a youtube video link to Alex Cox’s Moviedrome intro to Witchfinder General

Here is another youtube video link to Alex Cox’s Moviedrome intro to Witchfinder General

Here is a youtube video link to the film’s original theatrical trailer

Moviedrome Mondays: Alligator (1980) and Q: The Winged Serpent (1982)

This Moviedrome double bill entry consists of two low-budget independent films involving monsters – 1980’s Alligator and 1982’s Q: The Winged Serpent.

Alligator (1980)

I have posted a youtube video link below to Moviedrome presenter Alex Cox’s introduction to director Lewis Teague’s 1980 creature feature Alligator. Readers can also read Cox’s intro transcript here. The episode’s original airdate was July 19, 1992 (read here). While nowhere near as great as Q: The Winged Serpent (more on that later), Alligator is a surprisingly good, not to mention entertaining, B monster movie. Alligator’s genius lies not so much in it’s cliches as in the screenplay/story’s self-awareness of them – courtesy of John Sayles (yes that John Sayles) and Frank Ray Perilli.

Here is a youtube video link to Alex Cox’s Moviedrome intro to Alligator

Here is another youtube video link to Alex Cox’s Moviedrome intro to Alligator

Here is a youtube video link to the film’s original theatrical trailer


Q: The Winged Serpent (1982)

I have posted a youtube video link below to Moviedrome presenter Alex Cox’s introduction to late great independent director/writer Larry Cohen’s 1982 monster movie Q: The Winged Serpent. Readers can also read Cox’s intro transcript here. The episode’s original airdate was July 19, 1992 (read here). Not unlike Lewis Teague’s Alligator (read above), Cohen also embraces the cliches that shape the genres (or sub-genres) that Q: The Winged Serpent belongs to. For 1976’s God Told Me To (also directed and written by Cohen), it was a blend of horror, the police procedural and science-fiction. In Q: The Winged Serpent, Cohen combines those first two aforementioned categories with that of the heist film. To complete the picture, Cohen (as always) sprinkles a considerable dose of social comment both at the surface and at the center. If any of you readers are interested, here is a link to my favorite Larry Cohen films (read here).

Here is a youtube video link to Alex Cox’s Moviedrome intro to Q: The Winged Serpent

Here is another youtube video link to Alex Cox’s Moviedrome intro to Q: The Winged Serpent

Here is a youtube video link to the film’s original theatrical trailer

Also, here is a youtube video link to Larry Cohen’s Trailers from Hell commentary for it

An Alex Cox Intro Gem: Django Kill… If You Live, Shoot! (1967)

I would like to give a special shout-out to Steve (click here to view his youtube channel) – a loyal visitor of this site for finding an Alex Cox intro gem from 1997 that I will discuss shortly. The intro gem I am referring to is director Giulio Questi’s 1967 surreal horror spaghetti western masterpiece Django Kill… If You Live, Shoot!. Unlike the majority of Cox’s intros on here, this one was not for Moviedrome, but for another BBC2 series, albeit a limited one, entitled Forbidden Season. The series was dedicated to airing certain films implicitly or explicitly deemed controversial by the BBFC. Two years earlier in 1995, BBC2 aired a similar limited series under the title Forbidden Weekend and Cox would introduce a few films on there as well. In the youtube video link below, Cox throughly and eloquently examines everything from the film’s controversial history with the BBFC to why the film is such a unique spaghetti western. Not surprised considering that Cox wrote a richly detailed book on the sub-genre entitled 10,000 Ways to Die: A Director’s Take on the Spaghetti Western (read here). Once again, I would like to thank frequent site visitor Steve for finding this wonderful Alex Cox intro gem.

Here is a youtube video link to Alex Cox’s Forbidden Season intro to Django Kill… If You Live, Shoot!

Moviedrome Mondays: Escape from New York (1981)

Since Halloween fell on a Saturday this year, my post on my favorite horror films ever made may get offset by my traditional Moviedrome Monday entry. To prevent that from happening, click on this first link here and that will take you to my blog entry regarding my favorite horror films of all-time.

Once again, I could not find a youtube video link to Moviedrome presenter Alex Cox introduction to legendary director John Carpenter’s 1981 cult futuristic action thriller Escape from New York, so readers will have to rely on Cox’s intro transcript (read here). The episode’s original airdate was July 12, 1992 (read here). In regards to Escape from New York, I disagree completely with Cox’s opinion of the film. I truly believe that Carpenter made the most of it’s low-budget and location – two aspects that Cox seems to take issue with here. If any of you readers are interested, here is a link to my favorite John Carpenter films (read here).

Here is a youtube video link to the film’s first original theatrical trailer, which may be a teaser trailer, but I am not 100% sure

Here is a youtube video link to the film’s second trailer, which plays out more like a traditional original theatrical trailer

Here is a youtube video link to what may be either a longer version of the film’s second original theatrical trailer or the film’s third original theatrical trailer