Moviedrome Mondays: The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957)

Since I could not find a youtube video link of Moviedrome presenter Alex Cox introducing Jack Arnold’s 1957 science-fiction horror classic The Incredible Shrinking Man, my readers will have to make due with the episode’s transcript (read here). The episode’s original airdate was June 4, 1989 (read here). Interestingly enough, as Cox implies in his introduction, the only films that actually properly addressed the theme of nuclear war in the 1950’s (for the most part), were (ironically enough) campy science-fiction horror entries of that aforementioned decade. If any of you readers are interested in reading my list of my favorite Jack Arnold films, read here.

Here is a youtubeΒ video link to the film’s original theatrical trailer

Here is another youtube video link to the film’s original theatrical trailer – with Orson Welles providing voiceover duties

 

 

10 thoughts on “Moviedrome Mondays: The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957)

  1. This is a true classic science-fiction gem and still holds up today in my opinion.
    What a great selection,John. Here is a weird trvia note for you…the cat that played “Butch” is also Audrey Hepburn’s cat in “Breakfast At Tiffany’s”.

  2. I saw that film when I was quite young, and it really scared me. Now all I see is back-projection, and some clever ‘huge’ props. πŸ™‚
    Best wishes, Pete.

  3. I hear ya πŸ™‚ Did you know that the same guy who directed this film also did the Peter Sellers comedy The Mouse That Roared? πŸ™‚ I do not know If you ever saw it (you probably did though :)), but it is gut-burstingly hilarious πŸ™‚ Anyway, thanks for dropping by πŸ™‚

  4. I really should seek out some Jack Arnold films . As Alex Cox says they’re funny, visionary and intelligent. With good scripts too. I’ll look forward to your next Moviedrome Monday.

  5. Scary movie when I was a kid – but also has an uplifting ending – or so I felt. Always felt the effects were well done and ahead of their time.
    My feeling about the ending – which seems open ended to personal interpretation – was that no matter what happened to him, he could never cease to exist – and there was universes of experience open to him that probably nobody else would ever experience. Pretty heady stuff for a kid if I do say so.

  6. You know, I was always hoping that at the end, he would grow back to normal size only because of all of the ordeals he went through. Anyway, thanks for dropping by πŸ™‚

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s