Tags

, , ,

That’s right! This Moviedrome Monday entry happens to be another double bill 🙂

Hell’s Angels on Wheels (1967)

I have posted a youtube video link below to Moviedrome presenter Alex Cox’s Moviedrome introduction to director Richard Rush’s 1967 biker flick Hell’s Angels on Wheels. Readers can also read Cox’s intro transcript here. The episode’s original airdate was August 18, 1991 (read here). Not much to really add here and while it is far from a classic, there is no denying that it is highly entertaining – I especially agree with Cox regarding the motorcycle sequences and it’s use of music. Along with Easy Rider from two years later, Hell’s Angels on Wheels is little more than a product of it’s time; nevertheless, both are still worth a watch. My only issue with Cox here is that he credits the late Laszlo Kovacs as cinematographer on Close Encounters of the Third Kind, when it was actually photographed by the now also deceased Vilmos Zsigmond (read here and here).

Here is a youtube video link to Alex Cox’s Moviedrome intro to Hell’s Angels on Wheels and I would like to personally thank user giulio sacchi74 (a.k.a. Steve) for his valiant efforts in finding and uploading this link 🙂


Here is a youtube video link to the film’s original theatrical trailer


Rumble Fish (1983)

I have posted a youtube video link below to Moviedrome presenter Alex Cox’s introduction to legendary filmmaker Francis Ford Coppola’s 1983 drama Rumble Fish. Readers can also read Cox’s intro transcript here. The episode’s original airdate was during the early midnight hours of August 19, 1991 (read here). Everything Cox says here about Rumble Fish is 100 percent spot-on and yes, it is far superior to The Outsiders – also directed by Coppola earlier in 83 (both came out the same year) and like this film, it too was adapted from an S.E. Hinton novel. In addition, Rumble Fish feels more personal to Coppola than The Outsiders. For example, it has been reported that the story’s central relationship between two brothers (Matt Dillon and Mickey Rourke) reminded Coppola of the bonding he had with his older brother August, whom the film is dedicated to (read here and here). Along with composer/musician Stewart Copeland’s experimental score (read here and here), Rumble Fish is also notable for Stephen H. Burum’s unique black-and-white cinematography, which resembles what a b&w French New Wave film (read here and here) would look like lit with stylish touches relating to German Expressionism (read here, here and here) and Film Noir (read here). After one combines all of this together, Rumble Fish finishes up visually as an authentic piece of avant-garde cinematic art. If any of you readers are interested, here is a link to my favorite Francis Ford Coppola films (read here).

Here is a youtube video link to Alex Cox’s Moviedrome intro to Rumble Fish. Once again, I would like to personally thank user giulio sacchi74 (a.k.a. Steve) for his valiant efforts in finding and uploading this link 🙂

Also, here is a youtube video link to another version of the intro uploaded by Steve, in case any of you readers wanted a slightly higher quality version of it. Personally, I love the first version that Steve uploaded, but this one is every bit as great and is always welcome 🙂

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_mspYMzue9k

Here is a youtube video link to the film’s original theatrical trailer

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8kx_jtFN0H8